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Best Of: Max Brooks / 'What She Ate' / Poet Molly McCully Brown

Aug 19, 2017 - 00:49:21

Max Brooks' stable childhood with parents Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft stands in contrast to the wild stories he tells in novels like 'World War Z' and 'Minecraft: The Island.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'What She Ate.' Molly McCully Brown, who has cerebral palsy, grew up near the former Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. In her new collection of poems, she imagines life inside the colony.

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Billy Eichner / Julie Klausner Of 'Difficult People'

Aug 18, 2017 - 00:49:34

Billy Eichner and Julie Klausner play two snarky, pop culture obsessives in New York City in the Hulu series 'Difficult People.' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Patti Cake$.'

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Bridget Everett / John Cho

Aug 17, 2017 - 00:48:33

Comic and cabaret singer Bridget Everett (seen on 'Inside Amy Schumer') talks about her raunchy act, the music she grew up singing, and her role in the new film 'Patti Cake$.' Also, actor John Cho joins producer Ann Marie Baldonado to talk about 'Columbus,' culture clashes with his immigrant parents, and the first time he read the 'Harold and Kumar' script.

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In Trump's Gov't, 'The Regulated Have Become The Regulators'

Aug 16, 2017 - 00:48:39

Eric Lipton of 'The New York Times' says lobbyists now working for the government are leading a regulatory roll back that is benefiting the industries they used to represent. TV critic David Bianculli reviews Netflix's 'The Defenders.'

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Max Brooks On Doomsday, Dyslexia & Growing Up With Hollywood Parents

Aug 15, 2017 - 00:48:41

Brooks' stable childhood with parents Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft stands in contrast to the wild stories he tells in novels like 'World War Z' and 'Minecraft: The Island.' Ken Tucker reviews the new reissued, remastered versions of Nick Lowe albums.

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Poet Imagines Life Inside A Notorious Colony For The Disabled

Aug 14, 2017 - 00:48:20

Molly McCully Brown, who has cerebral palsy, grew up near the former Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. In her new collection of poems, she imagines life inside the colony. Brown also talks about faith, the death of her twin sister, and how her body and poetry are connected. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a concert recording of the Bill Evans Trio.

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Best Of: Tom Perrotta / The Unusual Story Of The Kellogg Brothers

Aug 12, 2017 - 00:50:43

Perrotta's previous books 'Election' and 'Little Children' were made into films, and 'The Leftovers' became an HBO series. His new book, 'Mrs. Fletcher,' tells the story of a single mother whose only child has left for college. Perrotta says the book was inspired by the upheaval he experienced when his own kids moved out. John Powers reviews the new Criterion release of Albert Brooks' 1985 film 'Lost in America.' A century ago, two brothers took the world by storm with their mass-produced boxed cereal. Medical historian Howard Markel chronicles their contentious relationship and their prescient and troubling concepts of wellness.

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Remembering Broadway Legend Barbara Cook

Aug 11, 2017 - 00:49:49

Cook, who starred in Broadway shows like 'The Music Man' and 'Candide, died on Tuesday at 89. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2016 about her struggle with addiction and her second career as a cabaret singer. Justin Chang reviews the film 'Good Time' starring Robert Pattinson.

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The Still Unfolding Story Of JFK's Assassination / Aubrey Plaza

Aug 10, 2017 - 00:49:47

Investigative reporter Philip Shenon tells us about newly-declassified documents which shed light on Lee Harvey Oswald's trip to Mexico weeks before the assassination. He met with Cuban officials and may have boasted about planning to kill the President Kennedy. "It's remarkable to discover that the CIA itself describes what happened after the Kennedy assassination as being a cover up," Shenon says. Also, Aubrey Plaza joins 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado to talk about 'Ingrid Goes West,' and her iconic role as April on 'Parks & Rec.'

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A Physician Wonders, Should I Help My Patients Die?

Aug 9, 2017 - 00:49:50

California physician Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter is grappling with when to implement her state's new End of Life Option Act — which allows certain terminally ill patients to receive medical assistance to hasten death. Her book is 'Extreme Measures: Finding a Better Path to the End of Life.' Also, we listen back to a 2008 interview with late country musician Glen Campbell. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'What She Ate.'

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How The Kellogg Brothers Revolutionized Breakfast

Aug 8, 2017 - 00:48:21

A century ago, two brothers took the world by storm with their mass-produced boxed cereal. Medical historian Howard Markel chronicles their contentious relationship, their prescient concepts of wellness, and their troubling ideas about eugenics and masturbation. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the 10-part series 'Mr. Mercedes.'

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'Why Buddhism Is True'

Aug 7, 2017 - 00:49:28

Science journalist and author Robert Wright says that Buddhist meditation might help counteract our natural tendency towards unhappiness and dissatisfaction. His new book is 'Why Buddhism is True.' Also John Powers reviews the new Criterion release of Albert Brooks' 1985 film 'Lost in America.'

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Best Of: Former VP Al Gore / Ariel Levy

Aug 5, 2017 - 00:50:12

The former vice president's documentary, 'An Inconvenient Sequel,' seeks to build bipartisan consensus to address climate change. "Mother Nature has a more persuasive voice than any of us," Gore says. Ken Tucker reviews Randy Newman's new album. 'New Yorker' staff writer Ariel Levy was five months pregnant when she took a writing assignment in Mongolia. She miscarried alone in her hotel room, and shortly after her return home, her marriage fell apart. Levy's memoir, 'The Rules Do Not Apply,' explores her loss of identity as a wife and mother, and how writing saved her.

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Remembering French Actress Jeanne Moreau / Playwright Sam Shepard

Aug 4, 2017 - 00:49:28

Jeanne Moreau, an icon of French New Wave cinema, died on Monday at 89. She starred in the films 'Jules and Jim' and 'The Lovers.' She spoke with Terry Gross in 1993 about disobeying her father to pursue acting and working with director Louis Malle. Sam Shepard, who died Sunday, penned more than 55 plays, including 'Buried Child.' His breakthrough film role was as astronaut Chuck Yeager in 'The Right Stuff.' He talked with Terry Gross in 1998. Ken Tucker reviews Randy Newman's new album 'Dark Matter.'

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Bill Moyers

Aug 3, 2017 - 00:47:40

Journalist Bill Moyers once worked as the special assistant to President Lyndon Johnson, and, 52 years ago, witnessed firsthand the political maneuvering that resulted in the landmark passage of Medicare. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Wind River.'

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Former VP Al Gore

Aug 2, 2017 - 00:48:45

The former vice president's documentary, 'An Inconvenient Sequel,' seeks to build bipartisan consensus to address climate change. "Mother Nature has a more persuasive voice than any of us," Gore says.

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'I Was Somebody's Mother': Ariel Levy On Love And Loss

Aug 1, 2017 - 00:48:23

The 'New Yorker' writer was five months pregnant when she took a writing assignment in Mongolia. She miscarried alone in her hotel room, and shortly after her return home, her marriage fell apart. Levy's new memoir 'The Rules Do Not Apply,' explores her loss of identity as a wife and mother, and how writing saved her. TV critic David Bianculli reviews three series worth checking out this August.

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Author Tom Perrotta

Jul 31, 2017 - 00:47:37

Perrotta's previous books 'Election' and 'Little Children' were made into films, and 'The Leftovers' became an HBO series. His new book, 'Mrs. Fletcher,' tells the story of a single mother whose only child has left for college. Perrotta says the book was inspired by the upheaval he experienced when his own kids moved out. Also, Lloyd Schwartz reviews a collection from Austrian pianist Artur Schnabel.

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Best Of: Jessica Williams / NYT White House Correspondent Peter Baker

Jul 29, 2017 - 00:49:23

The '2 Dope Queens' co-host talks about growing up in a religious family, landing a job on 'The Daily Show' at 22, and her new Netflix film 'The Incredible Jessica James.' Maureen Corrigan reviews a biography of noir writer Chester Himes. 'New York Times' Chief White House Correspondent Peter Baker has covered the last four presidents. He says President Trump has crossed so many boundaries that "it's easy to become inured to it."

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Jazz Pianist Dave Frishberg / Ray Manzarek

Jul 28, 2017 - 00:50:12

Frishberg is known for such witty songs as "Peel Me A Grape," "I'm Hip," and several songs from TV's 'Schoolhouse Rock.' He spoke with Terry in 1991. He has a new memoir. Also, to mark the 50th anniversary of The Doors' single "Light My Fire" hitting No. 1 on the Billboard chart, we listen back to Manzarek talk about coming up with his keyboard part. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Detroit,' directed by Kathryn Bigelow.

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The Unique Challenges Of Covering President Trump

Jul 27, 2017 - 00:48:56

'New York Times' Chief White House correspondent Peter Baker has covered the last four presidents. He says President Trump has crossed so many boundaries that "it's easy to become inured to it."

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The 'Great Quake' That Changed Our Understanding Of The Planet

Jul 26, 2017 - 00:48:53

Science writer Henry Fountain says the deadly quake that shook Alaska in 1964 was so loud some thought it was the beginning of World War III. His new book is 'The Great Quake.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews a biography of noir writer Chester Himes, and Kevin Whitehead reviews an album from saxophonist JD Allen's quartet.

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Jessica Williams

Jul 25, 2017 - 00:48:28

The '2 Dope Queens' co-host talks about growing up in a religious family, landing a job on 'The Daily Show' at 22, and why she feels she can "never be average." Williams stars in the new Netflix film 'The Incredible Jessica James.' Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg discusses the ubiquitous references to a single sentence of Jane Austen's work.

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Inside The Global Seed Vault

Jul 24, 2017 - 00:47:41

Cary Fowler discusses his new book, 'Seeds on Ice,' about a tunnel near the North Pole where hundreds of thousands of crop varieties are being stored in case of a catastrophe. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews 'Out in the Storm' by Waxahatchee.

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Best Of: Billy Bragg / 'Crime And Punishment In Black America'

Jul 22, 2017 - 00:49:20

The British singer-songwriter writes about skiffle, a music movement inspired by American roots music, in his new book 'Roots, Radicals and Rockers.' He brings his guitar to the studio to play skiffle and some of his own songs. Also, James Forman Jr., son of civil rights activists, says that African-American leaders seeking to combat drugs and crime often supported policies that disproportionately targeted the black community. His book is 'Locking Up Our Own.'

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Issa Rae Of HBO's 'Insecure' / Remembering George Romero

Jul 21, 2017 - 00:48:48

As a self-described "awkward black girl," Rae says she often felt that she was straddling two worlds growing up. She drew on her own experiences to create the HBO series 'Insecure,' now beginning its second season. Also, we listen back to a 1988 interview with 'Night of the Living Dead' director George Romero. He died Sunday at 77. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Dunkirk.'

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Our Vulnerable Election System / Remembering Martin Landau

Jul 20, 2017 - 00:49:55

Journalist Kim Zetter has been writing about cybersecurity and the integrity of our voting systems for more than a decade. Zetter talks about how election security has already been breached, and what kind of hack could happen next. Also, we remember Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1990. Book critic Maureen Corrigan recommends two comic novels.

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Billy Bragg

Jul 19, 2017 - 00:48:42

The British singer-songwriter writes about skiffle, a music movement inspired by American roots music, in his new book 'Roots, Radicals and Rockers.' He brings his guitar to the studio to play skiffle and some of his own songs.

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Inside The 'Shakespearian Irony' Of Trump & Bannon's Relationship

Jul 18, 2017 - 00:47:52

Author Joshua Green says that although Steve Bannon was instrumental to Donald Trump's election, it now appears that the president lacks the ability to implement Bannon's nationalist vision. Green's new book is 'Devil's Bargain.' Also, critic Lloyd Schwartz shares an appreciation of playwright Samuel Beckett's short silent film 'Film,' starring Buster Keaton.

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'Crime And Punishment In Black America'

Jul 17, 2017 - 00:47:49

James Forman Jr., son of civil rights activists, says that African-American leaders seeking to combat drugs and crime often supported policies that disproportionately targeted the black community. His book is 'Locking Up Our Own.' Also, critic John Powers reviews the novel 'Beautiful Animals' by Lawrence Osborne.

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Best Of: Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon / Life After Ballet

Jul 15, 2017 - 00:49:27

Comic Kumail Nanjiani remembers the first time he thought of marrying then-girlfriend Emily V. Gordon: when he saw her in a coma. Now the couple has co-written a romantic comedy based on their story called 'The Big Sick.' Wendy Whelan, a ballerina with the New York City Ballet, feared she would never dance again after undergoing hip surgery when she was 46. But after reconstructive surgery and months of physical therapy, she briefly returned to the dance company that had been her home for 30 years. The new documentary 'Restless Creature' focuses on that period, when her identity was shattered

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Jessi Klein: Head Writer For 'Inside Amy Schumer'

Jul 14, 2017 - 00:48:35

Klein won an Emmy for her work on 'Inside Amy Schumer.' Her book, 'You'll Grow Out of It,' a collection of humorous personal essays. [Originally broadcast July 2016.] 50 years ago, singer-songwriter Bobbie Gentry released "Ode to Billie Joe," which prompted dozens of jazz versions. Kevin Whitehead shares a few. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Lady MacBeth.'

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Following The Man Who Created President Trump

Jul 13, 2017 - 00:48:54

Roger Stone, one of Donald Trump's closest political advisers, is a colorful operative who has been accused of dirty tricks and disinformation for decades. Stone tried to convince Trump to run for president for close to 30 years. We talk with Morgan Pehme, co-director of the new Netflix documentary 'Get Me Roger Stone.' Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'War For the Planet of the Apes.'

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Kumail Nanjiani & Emily V. Gordon On 'The Big Sick'

Jul 12, 2017 - 00:48:23

Comic Kumail Nanjiani remembers the first time he thought of marrying then-girlfriend Emily V. Gordon: when he saw her in a coma. Now the couple has co-written a romantic comedy based on their story called 'The Big Sick.'

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Why The Justice Dept. Fails To Prosecute Executives

Jul 11, 2017 - 00:48:36

Only one corporate executive was convicted after the financial meltdown of 2008. Pulitzer Prize-winning 'ProPublica' reporter Jesse Eisinger's new book 'The Chickens*** Club' is about why the Department of Justice reaches settlements with banks and corporations and fails to prosecute executives. Also, commentator Mat Johnson shares a story about losing his hard drive.

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Life After Ballet: Wendy Whelan

Jul 10, 2017 - 00:48:12

Wendy Whelan retired from the New York City Ballet at the age of 47, after a hip injury. She wasn't sure she'd ever dance again, but after reconstructive surgery and months of physical therapy, she briefly returned to the dance company that had been her home for 30 years. The new documentary 'Restless Creature' focuses on that period, when her identity was shattered. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Golden Hill.'

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Best Of: 'How To Be A Muslim' / 'Daring To Drive'

Jul 8, 2017 - 00:50:28

"Professional Muslim" Haroon Moghul says, "Every time something bad happens you're called upon to apologize. ... Your entire identity is pegged to events in other parts of the world." His new book 'How to Be a Muslim' is about his experience as a first-generation Pakistani-American. Ken Tucker reviews an album of new material from late rock icon Chuck Berry. In protest of Saudi Arabia's de facto ban on women driving, Manal al-Sharif filmed herself driving and posted it on YouTube. She was arrested, but after expressions of outrage from around the world, she was eventually released. Her new memoir is 'Daring to Drive.'

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'How To Be A Muslim'

Jul 6, 2017 - 00:48:07

"Professional Muslim" Haroon Moghul says, "Every time something bad happens you're called upon to apologize. ... Your entire identity is pegged to events in other parts of the world." His new book 'How to Be a Muslim' is about his experience as a first-generation Pakistani-American, being diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and building the Islamic Center at NYU. Also, Ken Tucker reviews a new album from Swedish singer-songwriter Jens Lekman.

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The Decline Of Good Jobs In America / Sharon Horgan Of 'Catastrophe'

Jul 5, 2017 - 00:48:53

Author Rick Wartzman says that jobs offering security, decent wages and good benefits are becoming harder to find, in part because of automation, globalization, and the weakening of unions. His book is 'The End of Loyalty.' Also, Sharon Horgan, co-creator and co-star of the Amazon comedy series 'Catastrophe' talks with 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado about finding her comedy partner Rob Delaney on Twitter, her confessional approach to writing, and working with the late Carrie Fisher.

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Rhiannon Giddens

Jul 3, 2017 - 00:48:43

Giddens sings songs from her new album, 'Freedom Highway.' She co-founded the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which plays string band music from the African American tradition. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Modern Gods' by Nick Laird.

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Best Of: The Donner Party / Interviewing The World's Most Wanted

Jul 1, 2017 - 00:49:48

In 'The Best Land Under Heaven,' Michael Wallis chronicles the saga of a band of pioneers who resorted to cannibalism after getting stranded en route West. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Okja,' now on Netflix. Also, 'Washington Post' correspondent Souad Mekhennet talks about how she's spent much of the past 15 years reporting on Islamic extremist groups. She's interviewed leaders of Al Qaeda, the Taliban and ISIS. Her new memoir is 'I Was Told to Come Alone.'

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Broadway Chanteuse Barbara Cook

Jun 30, 2017 - 00:48:47

After starring in Broadway shows like 'The Music Man' and 'Candide,' Cook struggled with addiction, then staged a successful second career as a cabaret singer. Her memoir is 'Then and Now' is out in paperback. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Tony Allen's tribute to drummer Art Blakey.

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'The Addicts Next Door' / Actor Sam Elliott

Jun 29, 2017 - 00:48:55

West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the country. 'New Yorker' writer Margaret Talbot interviewed addicts, their families, and health professionals to understand why. Also, actor Sam Elliott (Tombstone, Road House, The Big Lebowski) says that being cautious about the roles he takes has helped him maintain his acting career for nearly 50 years. He plays an aging actor with a stalled career in the new film, 'The Hero.'

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American Health Care: What's At Stake

Jun 28, 2017 - 00:48:53

'Vox' correspondent Sarah Kliff says Republicans determined to replace and repeal Obamacare are finding it's "awfully difficult to write a bill that would get rid of it entirely." Also, David Edelstein reviews 'Baby Driver,' a film by Edgar Wright.

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Inside The Donner Party

Jun 27, 2017 - 00:49:27

In 'The Best Land Under Heaven,' Michael Wallis chronicles the saga of a band of pioneers who resorted to cannibalism after getting stranded en route West. He says "there's so much more" to the story. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Okja,' coming to Netflix this week.

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America's Obsession With Gold

Jun 26, 2017 - 00:48:56

Author James Ledbetter says many of the nation's worst economic catastrophes happened while on the gold standard. His new book traces the fascination with gold as a symbol of permanence and quality. His book is 'One Nation Under Gold.' Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Sexmob's album 'Cultural Capital.'

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Best Of: Roxane Gay / Sherman Alexie

Jun 24, 2017 - 00:50:02

Roxane Gay has finally written the book that she "wanted to write the least." Gay's new memoir, 'Hunger,' is about being hundreds of pounds overweight, and how she first started gaining weight after being sexually assaulted when she was 12. Also, Sherman Alexie discusses his new memoir about growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington, where poverty and violence were routine. His new book is 'You Don't Have To Say You Love Me.'

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How Russia Might Be Using Ukraine As A Cyberwar Testing Ground

Jun 22, 2017 - 00:47:37

'Wired' journalist Andy Greenberg says Ukraine has been the victim of a "cyber-assault unlike any the world has ever seen." Cybersecurity experts think Russia is perfecting attacks that could be used on the U.S. TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'GLOW' and 'Prime Suspect.'

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The U.S. Gov't's Secret Plan To Save Itself (While The Rest Of Us Die)

Jun 21, 2017 - 00:48:46

In 'Raven Rock,' Garrett Graff describes the bunkers designed to protect U.S. leaders in the event of a catastrophe. One Cold War-era plan put the post office in charge of cataloging the dead. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Big Sick,' starring comic Kumail Nanjiani.

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Sherman Alexie

Jun 20, 2017 - 00:48:55

Alexie's new memoir, 'You Don't Have to Say You Love Me,' is about his traumatic childhood on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington, his difficult relationship with his parents, and how brain surgery has changed him.

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Roxane Gay

Jun 19, 2017 - 00:48:34

Gay has finally written the book that she "wanted to write the least." The moment she realized she "never want to write about fatness" was the same moment she knew this was a memoir she had to write. Her new book is 'Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body.'

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Best Of: Seth Meyers / Former VP Joe Biden

Jun 17, 2017 - 00:50:30

Before taking over the reins at 'Late Night,' Seth Meyers spent spent 13 years at 'Saturday Night Live,' first as a performer, then as head writer and the co-host of 'Weekend Update.' He talks about political satire in the Trump era and being a comedian without demons. Linguist Geoff Nunberg says people have been complaining about the overuse of the exclamation since Victorian times, but he thinks the exclamation point gets a bad rap. Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks with Terry Gross about President Trump's tweets, and the effect racism had on the Obama administration.

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Jay Z

Jun 16, 2017 - 00:49:05

Last night Jay Z became the first hip-hop artist to be inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2010 about growing up in a housing project in Brooklyn, finding his identity in the recording studio, and misogyny in rap lyrics. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Mummy.'

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Former Vice President Joe Biden

Jun 15, 2017 - 00:49:00

Former Vice President Joe Biden has figured something out: "I learned how to become one of the most popular politicians in America," he says. "Announce that you are not running for president, and be authentic." In front of a live audience at WHYY studios, Joe Biden talks with Terry Gross about Donald Trump, his Catholic faith, and his plans on returning to electoral politics. Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Do Not Become Alarmed,' the new novel by Maile Meloy.

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Live With 'Late Night' Host Seth Meyers

Jun 14, 2017 - 00:48:45

When it comes to comedy, 'Late Night' host Seth Meyers is clear about what drew him to the field: "I got into it because it looked like the most fun job in the world," he says. "And it has not led me astray." Before taking over the reins at 'Late Night,' he spent spent 13 years at 'Saturday Night Live,' first as a performer, then as head writer and the co-host, alongside Amy Poehler, of the show's 'Weekend Update' segment. This interview was recorded in front of a live audience on June 9, 2017 at Verizon Hall in Philadelphia to celebrate Fresh Air's 30th anniversary as a daily national program.

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'Behind The Lines Of Jihad' To Interview The World's Most Wanted

Jun 13, 2017 - 00:48:46

When 'Washington Post' correspondent Souad Mekhennet chooses to go and conduct an interview, it can be a life or death decision. She's spent much of the past 15 years reporting on Islamic extremist groups, and she's interviewed leaders of Al Qaeda, the Taliban and ISIS. Mekhennet was raised as a Muslim in Germany. Her new memoir is 'I Was Told to Come Alone.' Linguist Geoff Nunberg says people have been complaining about the overuse of the exclamation since Victorian times, but he thinks the exclamation point gets a bad rap.

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An American 'Turning Point' In The War In Vietnam

Jun 12, 2017 - 00:47:39

Mark Bowden, author of 'Black Hawk Down,' talks about a turning point in the Vietnam War, the ferocious battle for the old imperial capital of Hue. He says "it was the bloodiest battle of its kind in the war." Communist forces took the city as part of the Tet Offensive of 1968, a coordinated set of attacks that soured many Americans on the conflict, and undermined the story US military leaders were telling the public and themselves about the war. Bowden interviewed dozens of participants in the battle as well as civilians who suffered terribly in the fighting. His new book is 'Hue 1968.'

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Best Of: Giancarlo Esposito / Polar Photographer Paul Nicklen

Jun 10, 2017 - 00:49:10

Six years after the demise of his 'Breaking Bad' character, Giancarlo Esposito is back on TV as the vicious drug lord Gus Fring in 'Better Call Saul.' He likens his current work to taking the character "back in time." Book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her early summer reading list. Photographer Paul Nicklen gets as close as possible to the animals he photographs. Once he found himself staring down the throat of an leopard seal in Antarctica: "Her head [was] twice as big as a grizzly bear."

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The Secret History Of Wonder Woman

Jun 9, 2017 - 00:47:55

Author Jill Lepore uncovers the political history behind Wonder Woman. The comic book icon's creator, William Moulten Marston, was inspired by both the women's suffrage movement and erotic pin-up art. Marston also had a secret life: He had a wife and a mistress and fathered children with both of them. Critic-at-large John Powers reviews the documentary 'Becoming Cary Grant.' Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'My Cousin Rachel.'

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The Saudi Woman Who Led A Movement By 'Daring To Drive'

Jun 8, 2017 - 00:47:22

In protest of Saudi Arabia's de facto ban on women driving, Manal al-Sharif filmed herself driving and posted it on YouTube. She was arrested, but after expressions of outrage from around the world, she was eventually released. Her new memoir 'Daring to Drive' is about how she became a women's rights activist after growing up in Mecca, and adhering to a fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Beatriz at Dinner,' starring Salma Hayek.

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Giancarlo Esposito Of 'Better Call Saul'

Jun 7, 2017 - 00:47:49

Six years after the demise of his 'Breaking Bad' character, Giancarlo Esposito is back on TV as the vicious drug lord Gus Fring. He likens his current work to taking the character "back in time."

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Nature Photographer Paul Nicklen

Jun 6, 2017 - 00:47:40

Nicklen gets as close as possible to the animals he photographs. Once he found himself staring down the throat of an leopard seal in Antarctica: "Her head [was] twice as big as a grizzly bear."

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Interracial Marriage & The 'Threat To White Supremacy'

Jun 5, 2017 - 00:46:37

Law professor Sheryll Cashin's new book 'Loving' chronicles the landmark SCOTUS case Loving v. Virginia, which overturned state laws prohibiting interracial marriage. Next week marks 50 years since the decision. Cashin also talks about growing up as the daughter of civil rights activists, and how her family integrated neighborhoods and schools in Alabama.

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Best Of: Sen. Al Franken / David Sedaris

Jun 3, 2017 - 00:48:19

As a former 'SNL' cast member and writer, Franken tends to see humor in politics. Despite this, he says his gut reaction to the Trump administration isn't levity: "This guy is outside the norm in many ways." Also, humorist David Sedaris pulls from his decades-old diaries in his latest book, 'Theft by Finding.' In it, he revisits major turning points, such as the death of his mother, as well as more prosaic, everyday moments.

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Paul McCartney / Ringo Starr

Jun 2, 2017 - 00:48:46

To mark the 50th anniversary of the U.S. release of 'Sgt Pepper,' we listen back to Terry Gross' 1995 interview with Ringo Starr, as well as her 2001 and 2012 interviews with Paul McCartney. David Edelstein reviews 'Wonder Woman.'

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'Sgt. Pepper' At 50

Jun 1, 2017 - 00:48:29

Producer Giles Martin says he included the Beatles' outtakes and raw performances in the new box set to show "how human the making of Sgt. Pepper was." The original album was produced by Martin's father, George, 50 years ago.

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David Sedaris

May 31, 2017 - 00:53:25

Sedaris pulls from his decades-old diaries in his latest book, 'Theft by Finding.' In it, he revisits major turning points, such as the death of his mother, as well as more prosaic, everyday moments. Sedaris talks with Terry Gross about how his writing has changed, leaving Raleigh for the Art Institute of Chicago, and why he stopped drinking.

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Senator Al Franken

May 30, 2017 - 00:47:17

As a former 'SNL' cast member and writer, Franken tends to see humor in politics. Despite this, he says his gut reaction to the Trump administration isn't levity: "This guy is outside the norm in many ways."

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Doo-Wop Singer Dion

May 29, 2017 - 00:49:35

Dion Francis DiMucci brought his guitar to the studio and performed old songs, new songs, and songs by performers who influenced him. He's spoke with Terry Gross in 2000. Also, critic John Powers reviews the best-selling French novel 'The End of Eddy.'

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Best Of: Aziz Ansari / NYT Book Review Editor Pamela Paul

May 27, 2017 - 00:49:33

Ansari talks about his award-winning Netflix series 'Master of None,' acting alongside his real-life parents, and hosting 'SNL' the day after Trump's inauguration. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews two solo albums from Harry Styles and Dan Auerbach. Also, Pamela Paul of 'The New York Times' talks to 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about her "book of books," a list of every book she's read since she was 17 years old.

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How Gen. Flynn Became Central To The Russia Hacking Scandal

May 25, 2017 - 00:58:00

Matthew Rosenberg of the 'The New York Times' began writing about General Flynn in 2009 in Afghanistan; now he's investigating Flynn's role in Russia's interference in the U.S. election.

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Aziz Ansari On 'Master Of None'

May 24, 2017 - 00:48:15

Ansari talks about his award-winning Netflix series, acting alongside his real-life parents, and hosting 'SNL' the day after Trump's inauguration. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her early summer reading list.

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The History Of Dentistry / NYT Book Review Editor Pamela Paul

May 23, 2017 - 00:48:26

Medical historian Richard Barnett traces the history of dentistry in his new book. He says that prior to the 18th century, the profession was often practices by charlatans with "big muscles." His book is 'The Smile Stealers.' Also, Pamela Paul of 'The New York Times' talks to 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about her "book of books," a list of every book she's read since she was 17 years old. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews two solo albums from Harry Styles and Dan Auerbach.

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Churchill, Orwell And The Fight Against Totalitarianism

May 22, 2017 - 00:48:45

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tom Ricks discuses how Winston Churchill and George Orwell stood up against totalitarianism from the far right and left. Ricks covered the Pentagon for the 'Washington Post' and wrote five books about the military and America's wars. He'll also talk about generals in Trump's administration. TV critic David Bianculli offers his first impressions of the new 'Twin Peaks.'

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Best Of: Comic Hasan Minhaj / Jill Soloway

May 20, 2017 - 00:50:09

'Daily Show' correspondent Hasan Minhaj describes himself as a "third-culture kid" who doesn't fully belong in either the world of his parents or that of his hometown of Davis, Calif. His new Netflix special is 'Homecoming King.' Milo Miles reviews 'Synthesize the Soul,' a collection of dance music from Cape Verde. Also, 'Transparent' creator Jill Soloway talks about their new new Amazon series 'I Love Dick.' It tackles themes of gender, sexual obsession and artistic insecurity.

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A Tribute To 'The Simpsons'

May 19, 2017 - 00:50:00

Thirty years ago 'The Simpsons' debuted on 'The Tracey Ullman Show.' To celebrate this milestone, we listen back to Terry's interviews with creator Matt Groening, Nancy Cartwright (Bart), Julie Kavner (Marge), Hank Azaria (Homer and others), producers and writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss, and composer Alf Clausen. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Alien: Covenant.'

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Comic Hasan Minhaj

May 18, 2017 - 00:48:39

The 'Daily Show' correspondent describes himself as a "third-culture kid" who doesn't fully belong in either the world of his parents or that of his hometown of Davis, Calif. His new Netflix special is 'Homecoming King.'

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Voting Rights & Trump's Election Integrity Commission

May 17, 2017 - 00:47:32

Ari Berman, author of 'Give Us the Ballot,' says the new commission will keep alive the idea that voter fraud is rampant — despite the fact that "all the studies show the opposite." Also, Ken Tucker reviews Angaleena Presley's album 'Wrangled.'

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Former Inmate Leads Women From Prison To Recovery

May 16, 2017 - 00:48:08

For Susan Burton, getting on track after being released from prison was a daunting experience. Now she's determined to help other women follow in her footsteps. Her new memoir is 'Becoming Ms. Burton.' Also, Milo Miles reviews 'Synthesize the Soul,' a collection of dance music from Cape Verde.

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'Fargo' TV Series Creator Noah Hawley

May 15, 2017 - 00:49:20

Hawley says his FX series, now in its third season, explores "the things people do for money." He also created the series 'Legion.' Kevin Whitehead reviews a book about jazz band Art Ensemble of Chicago. Linguist Geoff Nunberg comments on the common misattribution of famous quotes on social media

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Best Of: Gabourey Sidibe / Rhiannon Giddens

May 13, 2017 - 00:49:53

Sidibe's break-out role was in 'Precious,' Lee Daniels' 2009 film about a girl who is sexually abused by her father and physically abused by her mother. She speaks with Terry Gross about landing the title role despite the fact she didn't have acting experience, overcoming anxiety and depression as a kid, and how working for a phone sex hotline prepared her for acting (and interviews). Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'No One Can Pronounce My Name,' by Rakesh Satyal. Rhiannon Giddens sings songs from her new album, 'Freedom Highway.' She co-founded the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which plays string band music from the African American tradition.

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The Power Of Genes

May 12, 2017 - 00:49:05

Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee says genetics play a significant role in identity, temperament, sexual orientation, and disease risk — but that environment also matters. His book 'The Gene,' is now out in paperback. Also, David Edelstein reviews 'Last Men In Aleppo,' and David Bianculli reviews Amazon's 'I Love Dick' and Netflix's 'Anne with an E.'

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Rhiannon Giddens / 'Fresh Air' Celebrates 30 Years Nationwide

May 11, 2017 - 00:49:07

Giddens sings songs from her new album, 'Freedom Highway.' She co-founded the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which plays string band music from the African American tradition. Also, we celebrate Fresh Air's debut as a national, daily program on NPR, 30 years ago today. Join the conversation with #FreshAir30.

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'Transparent' Creator Jill Soloway On 'I Love Dick'

May 10, 2017 - 00:49:18

'I Love Dick' tackles themes of gender, sexual obsession and artistic insecurity. "'Transparent' was my origin story. This is my story about finding my voice," Soloway says. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'No One Can Pronounce My Name,' by Rakesh Satyal. And Kevin Whitehead reviews South African jazz pianist Abdullah Ibrahim's reissue of 'Ancient Africa.'

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Writer Mary Gaitskill / Cookbook Author Julia Turshen

May 9, 2017 - 00:48:44

Before she turned to writing, Gaitskill ran away from home and worked as a stripper. Her new collection of personal essays is 'Somebody with a Little Hammer.' Also, Julia Turshen speaks with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger about her new cookbook 'Small Victories.'

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Gabourey Sidibe

May 8, 2017 - 00:47:46

Sidibe's break-out role was in 'Precious,' Lee Daniels' 2009 film about a girl who is sexually abused by her father and physically abused by her mother. She speaks with Terry Gross about landing the title role despite the fact she didn't have acting experience, overcoming anxiety and depression as a kid, and how working for a phone sex hotline prepared her for acting (and interviews).

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Best Of: W. Kamau Bell / The Dying Art Of Writing Obituaries

May 6, 2017 - 00:49:40

Bell talks with Terry Gross about interviewing white nationalist Richard Spencer for his CNN series 'United Shades of America' and doing stand-up in black comedy rooms. He has a new memoir. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Kendrick Lamar's album 'Damn.' Bruce Weber and Margalit Fox have written obituaries for thousands of people, ranging from heads of state to the inventor of the Etch-a-Sketch. They are featured in the new documentary 'Obit.'

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Chef Michael Solomonov / Comic Chris Gethard

May 5, 2017 - 00:48:59

The Philly-based chef talks about his Israeli roots, and the secret to his award-winning hummus. He is the recipient of a 2017 James Beard award for outstanding chef. John Powers reviews 'Risk,' the new Laura Poitras documentary about Julian Assange. Also, comic Chris Gethard talks about his one man show 'Career Suicide,' which premieres on HBO on Saturday. And David Edelstein reviews 'Guardians of the Galaxy 2.'

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'How President Trump Could Get Fired'

May 4, 2017 - 00:46:54

'New Yorker' staff writer Evan Osnos discusses the likelihood that impeachment or the 25th Amendment will be used to remove President Donald Trump from office.

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A Forgotten History Of How Our Government Segregated America

May 3, 2017 - 00:48:53

Author Richard Rothstein says the housing programs begun under the New Deal were tantamount to a "state-sponsored system of segregation," in which people of color were purposely excluded from suburbs. His new book is 'The Color of Law.' Critic David Bianculli shares an appreciation of late director Jonathan Demme's 'Who Am I This Time?' which was made for TV.

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For Richard Ford, Memoir Is A Chance To 'Tell The Unthinkable'

May 2, 2017 - 00:48:26

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist revisits the lives and deaths of his parents in his new memoir, 'Between Them.' "As much as they loved me, an only child, they loved each other more," he says. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Anything is Possible' by Elizabeth Strout.

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Comic W. Kamau Bell

May 1, 2017 - 00:49:30

Bell talks with Terry Gross about interviewing white nationalist Richard Spencer for his CNN series 'United Shades of America,' doing stand-up in black comedy rooms, and how being an asthmatic "indoor kid" affected him. His new memoir is 'The Awkward Thoughts Of W. Kamau Bell.'

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Best Of: 'Veep' Producer Frank Rich / MLB Pitcher Rick Ankiel

Apr 29, 2017 - 00:49:46

Rich says the HBO series is about the "craven desire for power." He also writes a column for 'New York' magazine about the intersection of politics and pop culture. Maureen Corrigan reviews the book 'Hourglass' by Dani Shapiro. Rick Ankiel entered the major leagues in 1999 as an extremely gifted pitcher, then one day he suddenly lost it. His new memoir, 'The Phenomenon,' describes his struggle with an anxiety condition called "the Yips," as we'll as his unlikely comeback.

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The Wild Saga Of The Kidnapping, Crimes & Trial Of Patty Hearst

Apr 28, 2017 - 00:48:41

Hearst was abducted in 1974 and then declared allegiance to her captors. Legal expert Jeffrey Toobin does not believe Hearst was brainwashed, but rather, "responded rationally to the circumstances." His book 'American Heiress' is now out in paperback. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Circle,' starring Tom Hanks.

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For NYT Obit Writers, 'Death Is Never Solicitous Of A Deadline'

Apr 27, 2017 - 00:49:11

Bruce Weber and Margalit Fox have written obituaries for thousands of people, ranging from heads of state to the inventor of the Etch-a-Sketch. They are featured in the new documentary 'Obit.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews Kendrick Lamar's album 'Damn.'

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'Veep' Exec. Producer Frank Rich

Apr 26, 2017 - 00:47:57

Rich says the HBO series is about the "craven desire for power." Rich also writes a column for 'New York' magazine about the intersection of politics and pop culture. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'The Handmaid's Tale,' which was released today on Hulu.

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Inside Bellevue Hospital's Psychiatric Prison Ward

Apr 25, 2017 - 00:48:16

Dr. Elizabeth Ford treated mentally ill inmates in New York City for more than a decade. It was almost universal, she says, that they suffered abuse or significant neglect as children. Her book is 'Sometimes Amazing Things Happen.' Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead celebrates Ella Fitzgerald's 100th birthday.

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The 'Phenomenon' That Changed MLB Pitcher Rick Ankiel's Life

Apr 24, 2017 - 00:49:03

Ankiel entered the major leagues in 1999 as an extremely gifted pitcher, then one day he suddenly lost it. His new memoir, 'The Phenomenon,' describes his struggle with an anxiety condition called "the Yips," as we'll as his unlikely comeback. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the book 'Hourglass' by Dani Shapiro

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Best Of: Former Obama White House Staffer / 'The Secret Life Of Dictionaries'

Apr 22, 2017 - 00:49:02

Alyssa Mastromonaco worked in the Obama White House for six exhilarating and exhausting years. She talks about running on adrenaline, planning for worst case scenarios, and wearing Snuggies on Air Force One. Her new memoir is 'Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?' Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'A Quiet Passion.' Merriam-Webster lexicographer Kory Stamper talks about how words (like "f-bomb") are added to the dictionary, finding the first-known use of a word, and how English continues to evolve. Her book is 'Word by Word.'

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'Girls & Sex' And The Importance Of Talking About Pleasure

Apr 21, 2017 - 00:47:27

Author Peggy Orenstein says that when it comes to sexuality, girls hear that "they're supposed to be sexy, they're supposed to perform sexually for boys, but ... their sexual pleasure is unspoken." Orenstein discusses the effect hook-up culture, porn, and pop stars have had on girls' lives. Her book 'Girls & Sex' is now out in paperback. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'A Quiet Passion.'

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The Leakiness & Loneliness Of Trump's White House

Apr 20, 2017 - 00:47:50

As President Trump approaches his 100th day in office, 'New York Times' White House correspondent Maggie Haberman says "the magnitude of the job is sinking in for him."

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The Secret Life Of Dictionaries

Apr 19, 2017 - 00:47:38

Merriam-Webster lexicographer Kory Stamper talks about how words (like "f-bomb" or "bodice ripper") are added to the dictionary, finding the first-known use of a word, and how English continues to evolve. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Netflix series 'Bill Nye Saves The World' and the return of the FX series 'Fargo.'

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Former Obama White House Staffer Alyssa Mastromonaco

Apr 18, 2017 - 00:48:00

Mastromonaco worked in the West Wing for six exhilarating and exhausting years. She talks about running on adrenaline, planning for worst case scenarios, and wearing Snuggies on Air Force One. Her new memoir is 'Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?' Also, John Powers reviews the film 'Norman,' starring Richard Gere.

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Uncovering The Forgotten Osage Murders

Apr 17, 2017 - 00:48:20

Members of the Osage Indian Nation became very wealthy in the 1920s after oil deposits were found on their land. Then local whites began targeting the tribe, killing them off one by one in mysterious and disturbing ways. Journalist David Grann tells the story in his book 'The Killers of the Flower Moon.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews an album from The Menzingers.

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Best Of: Inside Jonestown / 'Better Call Saul' / Sasheer Zamata

Apr 15, 2017 - 00:50:29

In 1978, more than 900 followers of the Rev. Jim Jones committed mass suicide in Guyana by drinking cyanide-laced Flavor Aid. Journalist Jeff Guinn details how Jones captivated his followers in his new book, 'The Road to Jonestown.' TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new season of AMC's 'Better Call Saul.' Also, comic Sasheer Zamata speaks with 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado about her road to 'SNL.'

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'Leftovers' Actor Christopher Eccleston

Apr 14, 2017 - 00:48:45

The British actor plays a reverend in 'The Leftovers,' the HBO series about what happens after 2 percent of the world's population vanishes in a mysterious event. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Lost City of Z.'

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The Disappearing Colorado River / Sasheer Zamata

Apr 13, 2017 - 00:48:45

Journalist David Owen says that convoluted legal agreements and a patchwork of infrastructure determine how water from the Colorado is allocated. How can the river continue to support 36 million people in 7 states? His new book is 'Where The Water Goes.' Also, comic Sasheer Zamata talks with 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado about her new special 'Pizza Mind' and her road to 'SNL.'

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The Conservative Pipeline To The Supreme Court

Apr 12, 2017 - 00:47:59

'New Yorker' staff writer Jeffrey Toobin discusses Leonard Leo, the conservative lawyer who is responsible, to a considerable extent, for one third of the justices on the Supreme Court — Roberts, Alito, and now Gorsuch. Leo is the Executive Vice President of the Federalist Society. Also, Ken Tucker reviews Jessi Colter's new album, 'The Psalms.'

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The Making Of An American Demagogue: Jim Jones

Apr 11, 2017 - 00:47:49

In 1978, more than 900 followers of the Rev. Jim Jones committed mass suicide in Guyana by drinking cyanide-laced Flavor Aid. Journalist Jeff Guinn details how Jones captivated his followers in his new book, 'The Road to Jonestown.'

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How American Health Care Became 'Big Business'

Apr 10, 2017 - 00:47:07

Why are medical bills so hard to read? How is the consolidation of hospitals affecting the price of care? Why is it that more competition in the pharmaceutical industry drives prices up rather than down? Journalist (and former physician) Elisabeth Rosenthal investigates the dysfunction of the American health care system in her new book 'An American Sickness.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new season of AMC's 'Better Call Saul.'

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Best Of: Alec Baldwin / Trans Punk Rocker Laura Jane Grace

Apr 8, 2017 - 00:49:56

Alec Baldwin talks about his impression of Trump on 'SNL,' growing up watching old films with his dad, and a regret he has about his early career. Ken Tucker reviews a new album from Tennessee singer-songwriter Valerie June. Laura Jane Grace, the founder of the punk band Against Me!, felt so conflicted about gender growing up that she thought she was schizophrenic. Grace transitioned in 2012, and speaks with Terry Gross about how her music and life have changed since then.

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Remembering Comic Don Rickles

Apr 7, 2017 - 00:49:24

We listen back to two interviews with the great insult comic. He died yesterday at the age of 90. Rickles spoke with 'Fresh Air' in 2007 and 2008. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Colossal,' starring Anne Hathaway.

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How A War With Russia Could Start By Accident

Apr 6, 2017 - 00:46:59

David Wood of 'The Huffington Post' says Russian jets are playing "chicken" with U.S. planes in international airspace with alarming frequency, and that a rash response could lead to all-out war. John Powers reviews 'Tell Me How It Ends' by Valeria Luiselli.

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Alec Baldwin

Apr 5, 2017 - 00:48:57

Baldwin says his 'SNL' impression of the president is purposefully exaggerated. "There's a kind of volume to it," he says. "It's kind of the Macy's Day Parade [version] of Trump." He talks about the ups and downs of his career, aging in Hollywood, and his favorite movies growing up. Kevin Whitehead reviews Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah's album 'Ruler Rebel,' a mix of jazz and hip-hop.

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Trans Punk Rocker Laura Jane Grace

Apr 4, 2017 - 00:52:21

The founder of the band Against Me! felt so conflicted about gender growing up that she thought she was schizophrenic. Grace transitioned in 2012, and speaks with Terry Gross about how her music and life have changed since then. The band's new album is 'Shape Shift With Me,' and Grace's memoir is 'Tranny: Confessions of Punk Rock's Most Infamous Anarchist Sellout.'

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A 'Global Quest' For A Better Tax System

Apr 3, 2017 - 00:48:31

Why is filing taxes in the U.S. so complicated, expensive and time-consuming? When it comes to taxes, author T.R. Reid says other countries have done "what the U.S. Congress evidently can't do — they've made it simple." His new book is 'A Fine Mess.' Ken Tucker reviews a new album from Tennessee singer-songwriter Valerie June.

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Best Of: 'Monsters' Illustrator Emil Ferris / The 'Risk' Of For-Profit Colleges

Apr 1, 2017 - 00:48:34

After West Nile virus left her paralyzed, Chicago illustrator Emil Ferris had to relearn how to draw. She says that experience was key to the creation of her first graphic novel, 'My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.' Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Devil and Webster.' Tressie McMillan Cottom worked as an enrollment officer at two for-profit colleges, but quit because she felt uncomfortable selling students an education they couldn't afford. She says that for-profit colleges can exploit racial, gender and economic inequality. Her book is 'Lower Ed.'

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How 5 Hollywood Directors Filmed WWII

Mar 31, 2017 - 00:45:58

During World War II, the military worked with famous Hollywood directors to create movies to both boost morale back home and document the devastation overseas. Mark Harris' book, 'Five Came Back,' is the basis for a new Netflix docuseries. [Originally broadcast March 2014.]

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'My Favorite Thing Is Monsters' Graphic Novelist Emil Ferris

Mar 30, 2017 - 00:45:31

After contracting West Nile virus and becoming temporarily paralyzed, Chicago illustrator Emil Ferris had to relearn how to draw. She says that experience was key to the publication of 'My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.'

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Cyber War & North Korea's Nuclear Threat

Mar 29, 2017 - 00:47:58

'New York Times' reporter David Sanger talks about North Korea's nuclear program and warns that the regime, which has been "fodder for late night comedians for many many years," is no joke. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'One of the Boys,' about a corrosive father-son relationship.

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Inside DARPA: The 'Imagineers Of War'

Mar 28, 2017 - 00:45:59

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, DARPA, develops innovative technologies for the military. Its innovations led to the Internet, communication satellites, stealth aircrafts, drones, and driverless cars. Sharon Weinberger's book, 'The Imagineers of War,' tells the untold story of DARPA. Also, we say goodbye to 'Fresh Air' producer John Sheehan.

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How For-Profit Colleges Sell 'Risky Education'

Mar 27, 2017 - 00:46:15

Tressie McMillan Cottom worked in enrollment at two for-profit colleges, but quit because she felt uncomfortable selling students an education they couldn't afford. Her new book, 'Lower Ed,' argues that for-profit colleges can exploit racial, gender and economic inequality.

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Best Of: Pete Holmes / 'No One Cares About Crazy People'

Mar 25, 2017 - 00:49:07

Pete Holmes' new HBO show 'Crashing' is based on his real life, after his wife left him and he struggled to find his voice onstage as a stand-up comic. He grew up a devout Christian and says he saw himself as a "Good Boy," not cursing or talking about sex in the early years of his career. "I was basically picturing [Jesus] in the back of the club." Author Ron Powers' new book 'No One Cares About Crazy People' is both a memoir about his two sons with schizophrenia and a history of how the mentally ill have been treated medically and legally.

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The Supreme Court Ruling That Led To 70k Forced Sterilizations

Mar 24, 2017 - 00:47:47

In the first half of the 20th century, American eugenicists used forced sterilization to "breed out" traits they considered undesirable. The Nazis borrowed from the U.S. eugenics sterilization program. Adam Cohen tells the story in his book, 'Imbeciles,' now out in paperback. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Wilson,' adapted from a Daniel Clowes graphic novel.

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The Remarkable Story Of Dorothy Day

Mar 23, 2017 - 00:49:36

Day was a champion of the poor and the co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement. Her granddaughter, writer Kate Hennessy, talks about her grandmother's bohemian past. Hennessy's new biography of Day draws from family letters, diaries, interviews and her own memories. Also, 'Fresh Air' remembers Chuck Barris, creator of 'The Dating Game,' 'The Newlywed Game,' and 'The Gong Show.' He died Tuesday at 87. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1986.

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Inside The Wealthy Family That's Been Funding Bannon's Plan For Years

Mar 22, 2017 - 00:48:40

'New Yorker' staff writer Jane Mayer talks about Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah, who have poured millions of dollars into 'Breitbart News' and pushed to have Steve Bannon run Trump's campaign. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Devil and Webster,' a novel about a New England college in turmoil.

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Comic Pete Holmes

Mar 21, 2017 - 00:47:25

Holmes' new HBO show 'Crashing' is based on his real life, after his wife left him and he struggled to find his voice onstage. He grew up a devout Christian and says he saw himself as a "Good Boy" comic, not cursing or talking about sex in the early years of his career. "I was basically picturing [Jesus] in the back of the club."

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Father Of 2 Sons With Schizophrenia On His Struggle To Save Them

Mar 20, 2017 - 00:49:29

"There is no greater feeling of helplessness than to watch two beloved sons deteriorate before [your] eyes," says Ron Powers. His new book 'No One Cares About Crazy People' is both about his sons and a history of how the mentally ill have been treated medically and legally. Also, rock historian Ed Ward looks back on Chuck Berry's early career. He died Saturday at 90.

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Best Of: Jordan Peele On 'Get Out' / Irish Novelist Sebastian Barry

Mar 18, 2017 - 00:50:15

'Get Out' is about a young black man named Chris whose white girlfriend, Rose, takes him to meet her parents for the first time. Writer-director Jordan Peele (previously of 'Key & Peele') calls his movie a "social thriller." Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Frank Carlberg's meditation on Thelonious Monk. Author Sebastian Barry discusses his book 'Days Without End' with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger. It's about an Irish immigrant conscripted right off the boat, who falls in love with one of his fellow soldiers.

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'Cabaret' & 'Chicago' Composer John Kander

Mar 17, 2017 - 00:49:00

To mark the Broadway composer's 90th birthday, we're replaying excerpts of his 1991 and 2015 interviews with Terry Gross. David Bianculli reviews 'Julie's Greenroom' on Netflix, a children's series starring Julie Andrews and Jim Henson puppets. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'T2 Trainspotting.'

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Writer Elif Batuman On Her Novel 'The Idiot'

Mar 16, 2017 - 00:48:26

'New Yorker' staff writer Elif Batuman talks about her Turkish-American roots and her new novel, which follows a young woman's first year at Harvard University in the '90s, and how she finds love through email. It's based on her own experiences. Also, writer Daniel Torday reflects on the vandalism at a Jewish cemetery in Philadelphia. Milo Miles reviews Sxip Shirey's album 'A Bottle of Whiskey and a Handful of Bees.'

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'Get Out' Director Jordan Peele

Mar 15, 2017 - 00:48:34

'Get Out' tells the story of a young black man named Chris whose white girlfriend, Rose, takes him to meet her parents for the first time — without first telling them he's black. Writer-director Jordan Peele (previously of 'Key & Peele') calls his movie a "social thriller." He talks about his love of horror, his biracial identity, and making a film that would play differently to black and white audiences.

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On The Front Line Of The War Against ISIS

Mar 14, 2017 - 00:48:55

Rukmini Callimachi covers ISIS for the 'New York Times.' She just returned from Iraq where she was embedded with Iraqi soldiers as they battled to liberate the western half of the Iraqi city of Mosul from ISIS. She says ISIS is more fierce than ever.

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The Rise Of Addictive Technology

Mar 13, 2017 - 00:49:10

Author Adam Alter says that technology is designed to be addictive, and that the gratification it provides is similar to that of other addictive behaviors, such as drug abuse or gambling. Alter's book is 'Irresistible.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Monk Dreams, Hallucinations and Nightmares,' from pianist and composer Frank Carlberg. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Heretics' by Leonardo Padura.

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Best Of: Samantha Bee & Jo Miller / Writer Mohsin Hamid

Mar 11, 2017 - 00:50:21

'Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,' now in its second season on TBS, is a satire news show with a feminist point-of-view. Host Samantha Bee and head writer Jo Miller talk about getting started in comedy at 'The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,' misogyny on Twitter, and how their show has changed since Trump became president. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Personal Shopper,' starring Kristen Stewart. Finally, author Mohsin Hamid talks about his new novel, 'Exit West,' which is about knowing when it's time to flee your country, and what happens when you migrate to a nation that's hostile to immigrants.

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The Spanish Civil War & The Fight Against Fascism

Mar 10, 2017 - 00:49:52

According to Adam Hochschild, about 2,800 Americans fought in the Spanish Civil War, and some were bombed by Nazis years before the U.S. entered World War II. His book, 'Spain in Our Hearts,' is now in paperback. Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Sense of an Ending.'

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How Jeff Sessions & Steve Bannon Can Use The Justice Dept. To Remake America

Mar 9, 2017 - 00:48:16

'New York Times' journalist Emily Bazelon says the relationship between the Trump strategist and the attorney general predates the 2016 campaign, and that their anti-immigration policies come from fears of a growing minority population.

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Novelist Mohsin Hamid: 'Stories Are A Living Thing'

Mar 8, 2017 - 00:48:31

Hamid's new novel, 'Exit West,' is about knowing when it's time to flee your country, and what happens when you migrate to a nation that's hostile to immigrants. Hamid was born in Lahore, Pakistan, but has lived in New York and London. He talks about feeling like an outsider, social media and anxiety, and the power of language. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead shares an appreciation of composer and pianist Misha Mengelberg, who died recently.

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How Hitler & The Nazis Were 'Blitzed' On Drugs During WWII

Mar 7, 2017 - 00:48:22

Author Norman Ohler says that Hitler's drug abuse increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until the winter of 1944: "Hitler needed those highs to substitute [for] his natural charisma." Methamphetamine was distributed to German troops to keep them awake and "reduce fear" during long battles. Ohler's new book is 'Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich.' TV critic David Bianculli reviews the premiere of FX's 5th season of 'The Americans.'

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Samantha Bee & Jo Miller Of 'Full Frontal'

Mar 6, 2017 - 00:47:36

'Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,' now in its second season on TBS, is a satire news show with a feminist point-of-view. Host Samantha Bee and head writer Jo Miller talk about getting started in comedy at 'The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,"misogyny on Twitter, and how their show has changed since Trump became president. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album 'I See You' from the British group The xx.

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Best Of: Women In Combat / 'Feud' / 'The Photo Ark'

Mar 4, 2017 - 00:49:41

Maj. Mary Jennings Hegar talks about being shot down by the Taliban, being a warrior and mother, and why being told she "shoots like a girl" is a compliment. TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Feud: Bette and Joan.' Also, 'National Geographic' photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to document every captive animal species in the world. (So far he's photographed about 6,500.) He talks about racing against time to photograph endangered species for 'The Photo Ark.'

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Comic Louie Anderson On 'Baskets'

Mar 3, 2017 - 00:49:20

Anderson delivers a standout performance as the mother of an embittered rodeo clown in 'Baskets.' The show, co-created by Louis C.K, Zach Galifianakis, and Jonathan Krisel, is in its second season. TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Feud: Bette and Joan.' David Edelstein weighs in on the new X-Men film, 'Logan.'

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Helicopter Medevac Pilot Takes Aim At Military Inequality

Mar 2, 2017 - 00:47:22

Maj. Mary Jennings Hegar talks about being shot down by the Taliban, accidentally getting high from burning marijuana fields, and why being told she "shoots like a girl" is a compliment. She served three tours in Afghanistan and received the Purple Heart and Distinguished Flying Cross with a Valor Device.

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Trump, Putin, And The New Cold War

Mar 1, 2017 - 00:49:02

David Remnick and Evan Osnos of 'The New Yorker' say Russia was caught off guard by Trump's election. "This was like a bank heist that, instead of blowing the doors off the safe, they blew the safe up entirely," Osnos says. Also, Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Waking Lions' by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen.

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Bipolar And Creativity: A Study Of Poet Robert Lowell

Feb 28, 2017 - 00:49:03

Author Kay Redfield Jamison's new book describes how Lowell's manic-depressive illness influenced his life and work. "His manias tended to lead him into writing a fresh kind of poetry," she says. Lloyd Schwartz reviews a reissue of 'Chimes At Midnight' starring Orson Welles, and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from saxophonist Miguel Zenón.

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A 'Photo Ark' For Captive Animal Species

Feb 27, 2017 - 00:49:05

'National Geographic' photographer Joel Sartore is on a mission to document every captive animal species in the world. So far he's photographed about 6,500 species. He talks about some of the challenges he faces on the job, like getting an arctic fox to hold still, and being chased by elephants. Also, we remember actor Bill Paxton who died this past weekend. Paxton starred in HBO's 'Big Love,' and in the films 'A Simple Plan,' and 'Titanic.' He spoke with Terry Gross in 2002.

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Best Of: Neal Brennan / 'High Noon' and the Hollywood Blacklist

Feb 25, 2017 - 00:48:39

After working mostly as a behind-the-scenes guy on 'Chappelle's Show' and 'Inside Amy Schumer,' comic Neal Brennan is stepping out as a performer with his new Netflix special, '3 Mics.' John Powers reviews 'My Favorite Thing is Monsters,' a new graphic novel by first-time writer Emil Ferris. Author Glenn Frankel talks about the Hollywood blacklist and the making of the classic film 'High Noon,' which was written as a parable about the blacklist.

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'Moonlight' Creators / '20th Century Women' Dir. Mike Mills

Feb 24, 2017 - 00:48:09

Filmmaker Barry Jenkins and playwright Tarell McCraney drew on their own childhood experiences in making 'Moonlight,' a film about a boy growing up in a Miami housing project. 'Moonlight' is nominated for eight Academy Awards including best picture and direction. '20th Century Women' is nominated for an Oscar for best original screenplay. Writer and director Mike Mills was inspired by his desire to understand his mother. Set in Santa Barbara in 1979, it stars Annette Bening as a woman figuring out how to raise her teenage son on her own. David Edelstein reviews 'Get Out,' the new horror/comedy film by Jordan Peele.

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'Chappelle's Show' Co-Creator Moves Into The Limelight

Feb 23, 2017 - 00:46:57

After working mostly as a behind-the-scenes guy on 'Chappelle's Show' and 'Inside Amy Schumer,' comic Neal Brennan is stepping out as a performer with his new Netflix special, '3 Mics.' Brennan says he didn't get serious about stand-up until 'Chappelle's Show,' which he co-created and co-wrote, ended abruptly after Chappelle left the country. He talks with Terry about his friendship with Dave Chappelle, his family, and growing up with an alcoholic father.

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Why Trump Is 'Openly Dismissive' Of The Intelligence World

Feb 22, 2017 - 00:46:01

Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times talks about some of the national security issues he's been following. He says that when it comes to national security, President Trump "doesn't trust the civilian national security establishment and they don't trust him." John Powers reviews 'My Favorite Thing is Monsters,' a new graphic novel by first-time writer Emil Ferris.

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The Hollywood Blacklist and the Classic Western 'High Noon'

Feb 21, 2017 - 00:47:36

Journalist Glenn Frankel talks about a chapter of paranoia and persecution in America, in which the president, Congress, the courts and the press all played a part. Frankel's new book is about the Hollywood Blacklist and the making of the classic film 'High Noon,' which was written as a parable about the blacklist.

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Presidential Secrets

Feb 20, 2017 - 00:49:09

Author Mary Graham says President Trump has demonstrated a lack of transparency, in his refusal to release his tax records and health records, and in his immigration ban, which was issued without consultation from government lawyers, or agencies. Her book is 'Presidents' Secrets.' Also, 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger talks to Sebastian Barry about his novel 'Days Without End,' about an Irish immigrant who enlists in the U.S. Army in the 1850s.

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Best Of: Mahershala Ali / James Baldwin / Dir. Raoul Peck

Feb 18, 2017 - 00:49:48

Actor Mahershala Ali talks about 'Moonlight,' converting to Islam, and why he didn't feel understood as a kid. Filmmaker Raoul Peck's documentary 'I Am Not Your Negro' features the work of late writer and social critic James Baldwin. "Baldwin was one of the first authors ever where I felt not only at home, but he was speaking directly to me," says Peck. We'll also listen back to a 1986 interview that Terry Gross recorded with James Baldwin.

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'Manchester By The Sea' Dir. Kenneth Lonergan

Feb 17, 2017 - 00:47:47

'Manchester by the Sea' is nominated for six Oscars including Best Picture. We listen back to Terry Gross' recent conversation with director Kenneth Lonergan. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the CBS 'Good Wife' spin-off 'The Good Fight,' and the HBO series 'Big Little Lies.' We remember jazz pianist and singer Barbara Caroll, and film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Great Wall,' starring Matt Damon.

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Actor Mahershala Ali

Feb 16, 2017 - 00:48:15

The Oscar-nominated actor talks about 'Moonlight,' converting to Islam, and why he didn't feel understood as a kid. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novella 'Ghachar Ghochar.'

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Climate Change And The Trump Presidency

Feb 15, 2017 - 00:49:26

'ProPublica' journalist Andrew Revkin talks about President Trump's possible cuts to the EPA, as well as the potential impact of pulling out of the Paris Agreement. Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Tift Merritt's album 'Stitch of the World.' Also, we remember heroic Vietnam War commander Lt. General Harold Moore who died last week. Critic at-large John Powers reviews 'Kedi,' a documentary about the street cats of Istanbul.

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James Baldwin / 'I Am Not Your Negro'

Feb 14, 2017 - 00:48:50

Filmmaker Raoul Peck's Oscar-nominated documentary 'I Am Not Your Negro' features the work of late writer and social critic James Baldwin. "Baldwin was one of the first authors ever where I felt not only at home, but he was speaking directly to me," says Peck. We'll also listen back to a 1986 interview that Terry Gross recorded with James Baldwin.

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How Retailers Are Watching Us

Feb 13, 2017 - 00:49:11

Consumers have grown accustomed to the idea of online retailers collecting information about them, but author Joseph Turow says now brick-and-mortar stores are doing it too. His book is 'The Aisles Have Eyes.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new Count Basie sampler album, and writer Sarah Hepola shares her complicated feelings about Valentine's Day.

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Best Of: 'Tower' Director / Writer Bharati Mukherjee

Feb 11, 2017 - 00:50:14

The new documentary film 'Tower' tells the story of the 1966 University of Texas shooting that killed more than a dozen people. Director Keith Maitland says the incident was largely pushed aside for years. Maureen Corrigan reviews George Saunders' first novel 'Lincoln in the Bardo.' Also, we remember writer Bharati Mukherjee who died last month. She spoke with Terry Gross in 2002.

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The GOP Wants To Repeal Obamacare. But Then What?

Feb 9, 2017 - 00:48:47

President Trump has vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but Sarah Kliff of 'Vox' says it's "an overreach" to say that Republicans have a plan for what comes next. Critic Maureen Corrigan reviews George Saunders' first novel, 'Lincoln in the Bardo.'

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The 1966 Campus Shooting That Was 'Pushed Aside'

Feb 8, 2017 - 00:49:24

The new documentary film 'Tower' tells the story of the 1966 University of Texas shooting that killed more than a dozen people. Director Keith Maitland and survivor Claire Wilson James say the incident was largely pushed aside for years afterwards. "I think that cost people ... an opportunity to deal with that trauma," says Maitland.

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Uncovering Wall Street's Biggest Insider-Trading Scandal

Feb 7, 2017 - 00:48:54

Sheelah Kolhatkar talks about the investigation into billionaire hedge-fund trader Steven A. Cohen. Her book is 'Black Edge.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new FX series 'Legion,' based on the Marvel comic.

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'The Shattering Of An All-American Town'

Feb 6, 2017 - 00:48:15

Once a bustling factory town, Lancaster, Ohio is now beset by unemployment, low wages and drug abuse. Brian Alexander chronicles the rise and fall of his hometown in his new book, 'Glass House.' Also, we remember writer Bharati Mukherjee. She spoke to Terry Gross in 2002.

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Best Of: Director Jim Jarmusch / Modern Death

Feb 4, 2017 - 00:48:08

Jarmusch's new movie, 'Paterson,' which was inspired by William Carlos Williams' epic poem, is about a bus driver who writes poetry. His previous film was a documentary about Iggy and the Stooges. Film critic David Edelstein reviews Asghar Farhadi's film 'The Salesman,' which is nominated for an Oscar. Dr. Haider Warraich talks about how advances in medicine have changed the dying process — and the tricky situations that can arise as a result. Warraich also shares his experience as a Pakistani Muslim living in the U.S.

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'La La Land' Director / Meryl Streep

Feb 3, 2017 - 00:46:44

'La La Land' hearkens back to Hollywood's glory days of song and dance. Director Damien Chazelle says he aimed to make a movie even musical skeptics would love. The film is nominated for 14 Oscars. Meryl Streep works hard to sing badly in her film, 'Florence Foster Jenkins.' In it, she plays the title role, a character based on an actual heiress and socialite who devoted her life to music — despite having a squeaky, screechy singing voice. Streep is nominated for an Oscar for the role.

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President Trump's Nationalistic & Christian Right Influences

Feb 2, 2017 - 00:46:38

Sarah Posner, a reporter with The Nation's Investigative Fund, talks about how the Steve Bannon-Jeff Sessions-Mike Pence nexus is influencing President Trump's policies.

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Would SCOTUS Nominee Gorsuch Rule Contrary To Trump?

Feb 1, 2017 - 00:48:15

Legal expert Jeffrey Rosen says of Neil Gorsuch: "If he thought that individual liberty was threatened by presidential or congressional overreaching, then he would step in." Also, we remember British actor John Hurt, who died last week. Film critic David Edelstein reviews Asghar Farhadi's film 'The Salesman,' which is nominated for an Oscar.

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Director Jim Jarmusch / Sundance Recap

Jan 31, 2017 - 00:49:12

Jarmusch's new movie, 'Paterson,' which was inspired by William Carlos Williams' epic poem, is about a bus driver who writes poetry. His previous film was a documentary about Iggy and the Stooges. Also, 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado talks with 'Los Angeles Times' film critic Justin Chang about the highlights from the Sundance Film Festival.

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Medicine And Modern Death

Jan 30, 2017 - 00:47:12

Dr. Haider Warraich talks about how advances in medicine have changed the dying process — and the tricky situations that can arise as a result. Warraich also shares his experience as a Pakistani Muslim living in the U.S. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Perfect Little World' by Kevin Wilson.

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Best Of: Silicon Valley Survivalists / 'Manchester By The Sea' Director

Jan 28, 2017 - 00:50:17

Journalist Evan Osnos talks about the Silicon Valley survivalists who are stockpiling food and weapons and investing in luxury underground bunkers. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'A Really Good Day,' by Ayelet Waldman. Kenneth Lonergan's new film is about a janitor (Casey Affleck), crippled by guilt and grief, who returns to his hometown after the death of his brother. The film is nominated for six Oscars, including Best Director and Best Picture.

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Remembering Mary Tyler Moore

Jan 27, 2017 - 00:49:11

The television icon died Wednesday at the age of 80. She inspired a generation playing a single professional woman in the 1970s series 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show.' She spoke with Terry Gross in 1995. Also, rock historian Ed Ward listens back to The Monkees, 50 years later.

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What Does Putin Want?

Jan 26, 2017 - 00:48:22

Luke Harding, the former Moscow Bureau Chief for 'The Guardian,' says that Putin "wants to turn the clock back to an age ... where strong sovereign nations didn't talk about values or human rights." Harding also talks about the KGB break-ins at his apartment in Moscow.

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'Survival Of The Richest'

Jan 25, 2017 - 00:47:53

Journalist Evan Osnos talks about the Silicon Valley survivalists who are stockpiling food and weapons and investing in luxury underground bunkers. "They feel a sense of fragility in our politics," he says. Osnos has also been writing about Trump.

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The History of U.S. Intervention

Jan 24, 2017 - 00:47:54

Journalist Stephen Kinzer's book, 'True Flag,' explains how the Spanish-American War launched an ongoing debate about America's role in the world. Kinzer has also been writing about President Trump. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'A Really Good Day,' by Ayelet Waldman.

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'America In Laos & The Birth Of A Military CIA'

Jan 23, 2017 - 00:49:40

In the '60s, the CIA began a secret program that aimed to curb Communism by arming and training local fighters in Laos. Author Joshua Kurlantzick calls it "the largest covert operation in US history." Kevin Whitehead reviews a new double album from jazz trio BassDrumBone. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Founder,' starring Michael Keaton, about the founder of McDonalds.

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Best Of: Segregation In Schools / Rachel Bloom Of 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend'

Jan 21, 2017 - 00:49:30

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says school segregation will continue to exist in America "as long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children." Comedian and commentator Zahra Noorbakhsh often jokes about being a "pork-eating, alcohol-drinking Muslim, but after Trump's election she finds herself wanting to connect with her religious traditions. Rachel Bloom talks to 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado about 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,' the CW musical comedy series, now in its second season, that she co-created and stars in.

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Ethics Lawyers Call Trump's Business Conflicts 'Nakedly Unconstitutional'

Jan 19, 2017 - 00:48:31

Norm Eisen and Richard Painter discuss Trump's business conflicts. The new president will be "violating the constitutional conflicts clause ... as soon as he takes the oath of office," Eisen says.

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Muslim Chaplain Khalid Latif

Jan 18, 2017 - 00:48:21

Khalid Latif is one of the people profiled in 'The Secret Life of Muslims,' a digital series about Islamophobia. He is also the first Muslim chaplain at New York University. Comedian and commentator Zahra Noorbakhsh often jokes about being a "pork-eating, alcohol-drinking, married-to-an-atheist" Muslim, but after Trump's election she finds herself wanting to connect with her religious traditions. Commentator Mat Johnson looks back on Obama's legacy.

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Mormon Polygamy & Women's Rights / Rachel Bloom Of 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend'

Jan 17, 2017 - 00:48:34

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich says that for Mormon women living in 19th century Utah, "plural marriages" were empowering in complicated ways. Rachel Bloom talks to 'Fresh Air' producer Ann Marie Baldonado about the CW musical comedy series, now in its second season, that she co-created and stars in. Bloom plays a woman who follows an ex across the country.

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The Systemic Segregation Of Schools

Jan 16, 2017 - 00:46:47

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones says school segregation will continue to exist in America "as long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children."

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Best Of: Jeff Bridges / Sportscaster Joe Buck

Jan 14, 2017 - 00:51:29

Bridges talks about growing up in an acting family and the cult of 'Big Lebowski' fans. TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix adaptation of Lemony Snicket's 'A Series of Unfortunate Events.' NFL and MLB sportscaster Joe Buck talks about why he rubs some fans the wrong way, and his dad, hall-of-fame broadcaster Jack Buck.

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Lemony Snicket, AKA Author Daniel Handler

Jan 13, 2017 - 00:50:50

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix show based on 'A Series of Unfortunate Events' by Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler). Handler spoke to Terry Gross in 2001 and in 2012, when he brought his accordion to the studio. Also, we remember celebrated Indian actor Om Puri, who died last week. David Edelstein reviews the German comedy 'Toni Erdmann.'

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Rewriting the Genetic Code

Jan 12, 2017 - 00:50:26

New Yorker staff writer Michael Specter talks about the dramatic advances in genetic research. He says there are new tools that allow scientists "to edit genes in the way a word processor would edit words," so they can alter, delete, and rearrange the DNA of living organisms. Critic at large John Powers reviews '20th Century Women,' the new film written and directed by Mike Mills.

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Sportscaster Joe Buck

Jan 11, 2017 - 00:49:41

Buck's new memoir, 'Lucky Bastard,' details his experiences in sports and life, including his addiction to hair-plug transplants. When it comes to announcing, he says, "I don't have a rooting interest for either side." Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Natalie Hemby's album 'Puxico.'

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Why More Americans Are Giving Up On Banks

Jan 10, 2017 - 00:48:24

Author Lisa Servon says a growing number of Americans are finding alternatives to traditional banks, including prepaid debit cards, check-cashing centers, and payday lenders. Her book is 'The Unbanking of America.' Also, we remember activist and jazz writer Nat Hentoff with an excerpt of his 1986 interview.

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Jeff Bridges

Jan 9, 2017 - 00:50:09

Bridges talks about the lessons he learned from his father, actor Lloyd Bridges, the cult of 'Big Lebowski' fans, and how he calms his nerves on set. Maureen Corrigan reviews Betty Fussell's book of essays, 'Eat, Live, Love, Die.'

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Best Of: Lin-Manuel Miranda / 'La La Land' Director

Jan 7, 2017 - 00:47:18

'Hamilton' creator Lin-Manuel Miranda talks about Disney, code-switching as a kid in New York, and addressing Vice President-elect Mike Pence at a recent performance. 'La La Land' hearkens back to Hollywood's glory days of song and dance. Director Damien Chazelle says he aimed to make a movie even musical skeptics would love.

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'La La Land' Director Damien Chazelle

Jan 5, 2017 - 00:46:59

'La La Land' hearkens back to Hollywood's glory days of song and dance. Chazelle says he aimed to make a movie even musical skeptics would love.

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Reflections On Moderate Islam

Jan 4, 2017 - 00:46:52

Omar Saif Ghobash has written a book of letters to his sons, urging them to find knowledge, wisdom and understanding in all cultures and to reject hate and extremism. Ghobash is the United Arab Emirates ambassador to Russia. Also, we remember world religions scholar Huston Smith. He spoke to Terry Gross in 1996.

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Lin-Manuel Miranda

Jan 3, 2017 - 00:47:46

The 'Hamilton' creator talks about making mixtapes in the '90s, code-switching as a kid in New York, and addressing Vice President-elect Mike Pence at a recent performance.

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Best Of: 2016 Pop Culture Wrap-Up

Dec 31, 2016 - 00:50:02

Film critic David Edelstein, TV critic David Bianculli, critic at-large John Powers, rock critic Ken Tucker and jazz critic Kevin Whitehead share their picks for the best of 2016.

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Remembering Carrie Fisher

Dec 28, 2016 - 00:49:13

Carrie Fisher, the actress who became a pop culture icon for her performance as Princess Leia in 'Star Wars,' has died at age 60. She spoke to Terry Gross in 1990, 2004 and most recently in 2016 for her memoir, 'The Princess Diarist.' Rock critic Ed Ward reflects on The Ramones' self-titled first album, which debuted 40 years ago.

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Gaby Hoffmann / 'Blackish' Creator Kenya Barris

Dec 27, 2016 - 00:49:32

Gaby Hoffmann grew up in the Chelsea Hotel with her mother, an actress in Andy Warhol's Factory. Gaby appeared in 'Field of Dreams' and other films as child, but says she saw acting as "a means to an end." She now stars in the Amazon series 'Transparent.' [Originally broadcast October 2016] Kenya Barris' ABC comedy series 'Black-ish' was inspired by his own family experiences. He says the show is about "raising your kids in a different environment than you were accustomed to being raised in." [Originally broadcast May 2016]

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Best Of: Mike Mills On '20th Century Women' / Billy Eichner

Dec 24, 2016 - 00:50:09

Mills' latest film was inspired by his desire to understand his mother. Set in Santa Barbara in 1979, it stars Annette Bening as a woman struggling to raise her teenage son on her own. Mills also wrote and directed 'Beginners.' Actor Billy Eichner has been pop culture obsessed since childhood, and he embraces it all with his 'Billy on the Street' persona. He describes the concept of his man-on-the-street gameshow.

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'Moonlight' Director Barry Jenkins & Playwright Tarell McCraney

Dec 23, 2016 - 00:46:55

Filmmaker Barry Jenkins and playwright Tarell McCraney drew on their own childhood experiences in making 'Moonlight,' a film about a boy growing up in a Miami housing project. [Originally broadcast October 2016]

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Critics Pick Best Film & TV Of 2016

Dec 22, 2016 - 00:49:17

David Edelstein and David Bianculli sit down with Terry Gross to share their favorite films and TV shows of 2016. Linguist Geoff Nunberg explains why "normal" and "normalize" are his picks for the words of the year.

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Journalist: Trump Seems 'Willfully Blind' To Putin's Real Goals

Dec 21, 2016 - 00:49:05

'Politico' reporter Michael Crowley discusses Trump's relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, "There's something I think we don't completely understand."

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'New Yorker' Writer On Trump's Secretary Of State Pick

Dec 20, 2016 - 00:48:48

'New Yorker' writer Steve Coll says that though Rex Tillerson has conducted billion-dollar international deals as CEO of ExxonMobil, he has no government experience. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead remembers jazz greats who died in 2016.

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Director Mike Mills On '20th Century Women'

Dec 19, 2016 - 00:55:48

Mills' latest film was inspired by his desire to understand his mother. Set in Santa Barbara in 1979, it stars Annette Bening as a woman struggling to raise her teenage son on her own. Mills also wrote and directed 'Beginners.'

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Best Of: Transgender Activist Nicole Maines / Writer Maria Semple

Dec 17, 2016 - 00:50:15

Nicole Maines was born an identical twin, but unlike her twin brother, never identified as male. She became prominent in the trans community after winning a discrimination lawsuit. Also, contributor Sarah Hepola talks about the stress of the holiday season when you don't drink. And producer Sam Briger speaks to author Maria Semple about her comic novel 'Today Will Be Different,' about a stressed-out wife and mother who starts every day with a mantra.

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Inside The Prescription Drug Epidemic

Dec 15, 2016 - 00:49:12

Psychiatrist Anna Lembke says the medical establishment and drugmakers began telling doctors in the 1980s that opioids were effective treatment for long-term chronic pain. "That was patently false," she says. Her book is 'Drug Dealer, MD.' Critic Ken Tucker shares his top 10 favorite albums of 2016.

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How Fake News Spreads & Why People Believe It

Dec 14, 2016 - 00:48:38

Buzzfeed News' media editor, Craig Silverman, dissects how false stories during the presidential campaign were spread on Facebook and monetized by Google Ad Sense. Also, critic at-large John Powers shares six things he loved this year that he didn't get around to reviewing.

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Original 'Cabaret' Emcee Joel Grey

Dec 13, 2016 - 00:48:24

Grey talks about how he brought his decadent 'Cabaret' character to life on both the stage and screen, and reflects on coming out as gay after years of being closeted. His memoir is 'Master Of Ceremonies.' [Originally broadcast Feb. 2016] Ken Tucker reviews Kacey Musgraves' Christmas album.

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Billy Eichner Of 'Billy On The Street'

Dec 12, 2016 - 00:48:43

Eichner has been pop culture obsessed since childhood, and he embraces it all with his 'Billy on the Street' persona. He describes the concept of his man-on-the-street gameshow, his love/hate relationship with celebrity culture, and the advice Joan Rivers gave him. Also, contributor Sarah Hepola talks about the stress of the holiday season when you don't drink.

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Best Of: Megyn Kelly / NYT Exec. Editor Dean Baquet

Dec 10, 2016 - 00:49:57

Baquet talks about covering tweets as news and his decision to use the word "lie" in a headline about Trump. Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly discusses "PC culture" and the threatening and misogynist tweets she received from Trump supporters. Her new memoir is 'Settle For More.' Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her top 10 books of 2016.

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Remembering 'Mary Tyler Moore' Producer Grant Tinker

Dec 9, 2016 - 00:49:17

Tinker was a former NBC chairman and oversaw shows like 'Cheers,' 'Hill Street Blues,' and 'St. Elsewhere.' He also founded MTM Enterprises with his then wife, Mary Tyler Moore, and produced her hit show. Tinker died last month. We remember him with his 1994 interview and a 1995 interview with Moore. Ken Tucker reviews Allyson Seconds' album 'Little World.' Also, film critic David Edelstein reviews 'La La Land.'

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NYT Exec. Editor On The New Terrain Of Covering Trump

Dec 8, 2016 - 00:48:43

Dean Baquet talks about covering tweets as news, his decision to use the word "lie" in a headline about Trump and why he's not worried about libel suits from the president-elect. Book critic Maureen Corrigan shares her top 10 books of 2016.

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Megyn Kelly Of Fox News

Dec 7, 2016 - 00:49:07

Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly talks about "PC culture,"coming forward about CEO Roger Ailes sexually harassing her, and how Trump's election has empowered white nationalists. Her new memoir is 'Settle For More.'

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Dwight Yoakam / Author Maria Semple

Dec 6, 2016 - 00:49:36

Country music star Dwight Yoakam talks about his grandfather's work in the coal mines and plays songs from his latest album, 'Swimmin' Pools, Movie Stars.' Also, producer Sam Briger speaks to author Maria Semple about her comic novel 'Today Will Be Different,' about a stressed-out wife and mother who starts every day with a mantra. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a recording of Dizzy Gillespie's 1980 "concert of the century" in Montreal.

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Transgender Activists Nicole Maines & Kylar Broadus

Dec 5, 2016 - 00:48:28

Nicole Maines was born an identical twin, but unlike her twin brother, never identified as male. She became prominent in the trans community after winning a discrimination lawsuit. Kylar Broadus directed The Transgender Civil Rights Project and was the first openly transgender person to testify before the U.S. Senate. They're both featured in the HBO documentary, 'The Trans List.' Ken Tucker reviews Miranda Lambert's new album, 'The Weight of These Wings.'

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Best Of: Carrie Fisher / LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones

Dec 3, 2016 - 00:50:18

Carrie Fisher was an insecure 19-year-old when she appeared as Princess Leia in the first 'Star Wars' movie, a role that would come to define her career. She tells Terry Gross that despite becoming romantically involved with her older, married co-star, Harrison Ford, she often felt isolated on set. Fisher has a new memoir called 'The Princess Diarist.' Cleve Jones became an activist after Harvey Milk's assassination, and he lost countless friends to the AIDS epidemic. He conceived the AIDS Memorial Quilt in 1985. His memoir is 'When We Rise.'

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Photographer William Christenberry / Country Singer Charlie Rich

Dec 2, 2016 - 00:48:01

Christenberry, who died on Monday, drew on his childhood experiences in the rural South. One of his pieces was inspired by an encounter he had with a Klansman. [Originally broadcast in 1997] Charlie Rich, who died in 1995, was known for "countrypolitan" music, which featured orchestral arrangements and backup singers. A new Rich tribute album has just been released. [Originally broadcast in 1992.] Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Jackie,' a biopic about Jacqueline Kennedy.

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Trump's Potential Conflicts Of Interest: 'They're Everywhere'

Dec 1, 2016 - 00:47:38

'New York Times' reporter Eric Lipton warns that Donald Trump could take actions as president that would benefit his business holdings, and "it wouldn't be a formal ethics violation," Lipton says. Also jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews prolific guitarist Mary Halvorson's album 'Away with You.'

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NPR
'Manchester By The Sea' Director Kenneth Lonergan

Nov 30, 2016 - 00:48:26

Kenneth Lonergan's new film is about a janitor (Casey Affleck), crippled by guilt and grief, who returns to his hometown after the death of his brother. Also, critic at large John Powers reviews two works that confront the refugee crisis.

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NPR
LGBTQ Activist Cleve Jones

Nov 29, 2016 - 00:47:13

Jones became an activist after Harvey Milk's assassination, and he lost countless friends to the AIDS epidemic. He says, "There are some days when it is so painful that I really can barely function." He conceived the AIDS Memorial Quilt in 1985. His memoir is 'When We Rise.'

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NPR
Carrie Fisher

Nov 28, 2016 - 00:46:48

Carrie Fisher was an insecure 19-year-old when she appeared as Princess Leia in the first Star Wars movie, a role that would come to define her career. She tells Terry Gross that despite becoming romantically involved with her older, married co-star, Harrison Ford, she often felt isolated on set. Fisher has a new memoir, called 'The Princess Diarist.' Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews the national touring production of the Broadway musical "An American in Paris.'

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NPR
Best Of: Zadie Smith / Trevor Noah

Nov 26, 2016 - 00:49:50

Writer Zadie Smith talks about nostalgia and why she likes talking to people with whom she disagrees. Her new novel is 'Swing Time.' Also, 'Daily Show' host Trevor Noah revisits his childhood in apartheid-era South Africa in his new memoir, 'Born a Crime.' Noah says writing the book helped him see that his mother was the real hero of his story.

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NPR
Remembering Leonard Cohen

Nov 25, 2016 - 00:47:23

Before he died earlier this month, Cohen released a new album with songs that wrestled with mortality, transcendence and the question of God — themes he touched on in this 2006 interview with Terry Gross.

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NPR
Johnny Cash / Ray Charles

Nov 24, 2016 - 00:48:23

For Thanksgiving, two archival interviews with American music icons: Cash spoke to Terry Gross in 1997, Charles in 1998.

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NPR
Remembering Sharon Jones

Nov 23, 2016 - 00:49:16

The powerhouse soul singer for The Dap-Kings spoke to 'Fresh Air' in '07 and again in '16, after she'd been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Jones died on Nov. 18. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Michael Chabon's new novel, 'Moonglow.'

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NPR
Trevor Noah

Nov 22, 2016 - 00:48:14

The 'Daily Show' host revisits his childhood in apartheid-era South Africa in his new memoir, 'Born a Crime.' Noah says writing the book helped him see that his mother was the real hero of his story.

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NPR
Zadie Smith

Nov 21, 2016 - 00:49:45

Writer Zadie Smith talks about the nature of talent, nostalgia, and why she likes talking to people with whom she disagrees. Her new novel is 'Swing Time.'

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NPR
Best Of: Francis Ford Coppola / Casey Affleck

Nov 19, 2016 - 00:49:25

Coppola was 29 when he signed on to direct 'The Godfather.' Coppola talks about his disagreements with the studio, casting Marlon Brando, and his own Italian-American family. Also, Casey Affleck talks about his new film 'Manchester by the Sea,' his childhood, and getting cast in 'Gone Baby Gone,' by his brother Ben.

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NPR
Novelist Colson Whitehead / Rep. John Lewis

Nov 18, 2016 - 00:49:15

As a child, Colson Whitehead imagined the Underground Railroad to be a subway beneath the earth that escaped slaves could ride to freedom. He returns to his childhood vision in his novel, 'Underground Railroad,' which won the National Book Award. Congressman John Lewis recalls marching for voting rights from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965, when he was beaten by police. He spoke to Terry Gross in 2009. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Manchester by the Sea.'

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NPR
Steve Bannon's Rise / Casey Affleck

Nov 17, 2016 - 00:49:02

'Bloomberg' journalist Joshua Green discusses Steve Bannon's work for the alt-right website Breitbart News. Trump's chief strategist, Green says, was "one of the major figures" in Clinton's defeat. Also, Casey Affleck talks about his new film 'Manchester by the Sea,' his childhood, and getting cast in 'Gone Baby Gone,' by his brother Ben.

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NPR
Francis Ford Coppola On 'The Godfather'

Nov 16, 2016 - 00:53:11

Coppola was 29 when he signed on to direct a film based on Mario Puzo's novel about an Italian-American crime family. "I was always just trying to bluff the studio to let me do it my way," he says.

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NPR
How Trump Could 'Undermine' Obama's Presidency

Nov 15, 2016 - 00:48:12

'New Yorker' writer Evan Osnos talks about the executive orders and other actions that Trump can use to undo existing agreements on climate change, immigration and foreign policy.

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NPR
Anna Kendrick

Nov 14, 2016 - 00:48:21

The 'Pitch Perfect' star talks about being small with a powerful voice, her break-out role in 'Up in the Air,' and why church scared her as a kid. Her new book of personal essays is 'Scrappy Little Nobody.' Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Mid-Thirties Single Scene' from Scott and Charlene's Wedding.

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NPR
Best Of: Issa Rae / 'Westworld' Creators

Nov 12, 2016 - 00:49:43

In the HBO series 'Insecure,' Issa Rae's character feels like she's "not black enough for the black people and not white enough for the white people." John Powers reviews the film 'Certain Women.' Also, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy offer a pessimistic view of human nature in 'Westworld,' HBO's futuristic TV series about a theme park that allows tourists to act out their Wild West fantasies.

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NPR
Veterans Share Stories Of War And Its Consequences

Nov 11, 2016 - 00:49:20

To mark Veterans' Day, we're replaying interviews with Iraq War veterans Brian Castner and Kayla Williams, and WWII veteran Robert Kotlowitz. Also, Brian Turner reads his poem 'Here, Bullet.' Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Arrival.'

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NPR
The Platinum Age Of TV

Nov 10, 2016 - 00:48:47

"Television has really become where a lot of the action is right now," critic David Bianculli says. His new book revisits the best of the small screen — from 'I Love Lucy' to 'The Walking Dead.' Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Pieces of Soap,' a book of essays by Stanley Elkin.

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NPR
How Trump Broke Campaign Norms But Still Won

Nov 9, 2016 - 00:48:04

We discuss the 2016 election with 'Atlantic Magazine' correspondent James Fallows, who spent three years flying his own plane to small towns across the U.S., reporting on the people he met.

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NPR
Issa Rae On 'Insecure'

Nov 8, 2016 - 00:49:16

In the HBO series 'Insecure,' Issa Rae's character feels like she's "not black enough for the black people and not white enough for the white people." Rae talks about her comedy influences, growing up with a Senegalese father, and her web series 'The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl.' John Powers reviews the film 'Certain Women.'

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NPR
'Doonesbury' Cartoonist Garry Trudeau / 'Westworld' Creators

Nov 7, 2016 - 00:47:22

"Donald and I go all the way back to when his hair was dark brown," Garry Trudeau jokes. His new book, 'Yuge!,' is a collection of 30 years of comic strips featuring Trump as a character. Also, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy offer a pessimistic view of human nature in 'Westworld,' HBO's futuristic TV series about a theme park that allows tourists to act out their Wild West fantasies.

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NPR
Best Of: Stephen Colbert / Donald Glover

Nov 5, 2016 - 00:50:05

For the first time since hosting 'The Late Show,' Colbert talks to Terry Gross about shedding his 'Colbert Report' character and becoming comfortable playing himself. Ken Tucker reviews Leonard Cohen's new album. Donald Glover created and co-stars in the FX series 'Atlanta,' set on the fringes of the city's hip-hop scene. Outside of the show he does stand-up and has recorded music under the name Childish Gambino.

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NPR
Author Viet Thanh Nguyen: 'Vietnam Is A Country And Not A War'

Nov 4, 2016 - 00:47:27

Viet Thanh Nguyen and his family fled their village in South Vietnam in 1975. He won the Pulitzer Prize this year for 'The Sympathizer,' a spy novel set during and just after the war in Vietnam. [Originally broadcast May 2016] Mat Johnson reviews the film 'Loving.'

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NPR
Trump And The White Working Class

Nov 3, 2016 - 00:46:54

'New Yorker' writer George Packer says years of neglect from the Democrats enabled Trump to exploit the biases of the white working class and turn them into a "self-conscious identity group." Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'Hacksaw Ridge,' directed by Mel Gibson.

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NPR
Stephen Colbert

Nov 2, 2016 - 00:47:06

For the first time since hosting 'The Late Show,' Colbert talks to Terry Gross about shedding his 'Colbert Report' character and becoming comfortable playing himself.

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NPR
Donald Glover On 'Atlanta'

Nov 1, 2016 - 00:47:29

Glover created and co-stars in the FX series 'Atlanta,' set on the fringes of the city's hip-hop scene. Outside of the show he does stand-up and has recorded music under the name Childish Gambino. Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews a biography of Eleanor Roosevelt.

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NPR
A Hospice Chaplain On Life, Death, And The 'Strength Of The Human Soul'

Oct 31, 2016 - 00:46:47

Kerry Egan's job is to help dying people accept their own mortality. It's profoundly sad, but it's also rewarding. "I'm constantly reminded of ... how much love people have for each other," she says. Her book is 'On Living.' Also, Ken Tucker reviews Leonard Cohen's album 'You Want It Darker.'

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NPR
Best Of: Comic Chris Gethard / Anthony Bourdain

Oct 29, 2016 - 00:49:41

Gethard tells stories of hitting rock bottom in his new one-man off-Broadway show, 'Career Suicide,' which is billed as a comedy about "suicide, depression, alcoholism and all the other funniest parts of life." The host of the CNN series 'Parts Unknown' talks about what food sends him into a "spiral of depression," the perils of cooking bacon naked, and how he fell in love with Vietnam. His new cookbook, 'Appetites,' features recipes he cooks at home for his daughter.

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NPR
Remembering 1960s Singer Bobby Vee

Oct 28, 2016 - 00:48:24

Bobby Vee was a teen idol whose hits included 'Run to Him,' 'Take Good Care of My Baby,' and 'Rubber Ball.' He died Monday at the age of 73. Terry Gross spoke to Vee in 1999. Film critic David Edelstein reviews 'The Handmaiden,' directed by Park Chan-wook.

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NPR
Anthony Bourdain

Oct 27, 2016 - 00:49:05

The host of the CNN series 'Parts Unknown' talks about what food sends him into a "spiral of depression," the perils of cooking bacon naked, and how he fell in love with Vietnam. His new cookbook, 'Appetites,' features recipes he cooks at home for his daughter. 'Fresh Air' contributor Mat Johnson describes his mother's journey with multiple sclerosis.

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NPR
The Twitter Paradox

Oct 26, 2016 - 00:48:39

How a platform designed for free speech enables Internet trolls. 'National Review' writer David French describes the hateful tweets he received after he criticized Donald Trump and the alt-right. 'BuzzFeed' reporter Charlie Warzel discusses what Twitter is and isn't doing about trolls.

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