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Rethinking School

Aug 11, 2017 - 00:52:22

For most of modern history, humans have placed smaller humans in institutions called schools. But what parts of this model still work? And what must change? This hour, TED speakers rethink education.TED speakers include teacher Tyler DeWitt, social entrepreneur Sal Khan, international education expert Andreas Schleicher, and educator Linda Cliatt-Wayman.

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Prevention

Jul 21, 2017 - 00:52:38

We often know how to plan for the future, but find it hard to take the necessary steps. This hour, TED speakers challenge the inevitable and explore what to do today to prepare ourselves for tomorrow.TED speakers include neuroscientists Daniel Levitin and Rebecca Brachman, writer (and neuroscientist) Lisa Genova, epidemiologist Seth Berkley, and behavioral economist Daniel Goldstein.

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Crisis And Response

Jul 14, 2017 - 00:53:13

Moments of crisis can upend our lives, but can also help define them. This episode, TED speakers explore how a quick, compassionate or unexpected response can turn crisis into opportunity. Guests include physician Ken Kamler, motivational speaker Matt Weinstein, Melissa Fleming of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, activist Nancy Lublin and photojournalist Kitra Cahana. (Original broadcast date: April 1, 2016)

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Peering Into Space

Jun 30, 2017 - 00:53:19

This hour, we'll hear from TED speakers who share an infectious sense of wonder and curiosity about our place in the universe and what lies beyond our skies. TED speakers include physicist Brian Greene, astronomer Phil Plait, and astronomer Jill Tarter. (Original broadcast date: March 8, 2013)

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Truth And Lies

Jun 23, 2017 - 00:53:13

We live in a time where the line between fact and fiction is increasingly blurry — where each us can live in a constructed reality. This hour, TED speakers share insights on navigating a world where even the facts are up for debate. TED speakers include historian Deborah Lipstadt, writer Michael Specter, cybersecurity expert Laura Galante, journalist Stephanie Busari, and writer Carrie Poppy.

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A Better You

Jun 16, 2017 - 00:51:53

Many of us are lured by the promise of self-improvement, but find it hard to follow through. In our 100th episode, TED speakers reveal ways to discover our better selves, from simple hacks to deep introspection. TED speakers include entrepreneur Jia Jiang, Headspace co-founder Andy Puddicombe, psychologist Emily Balcetis, technologist Matt Cutts, and New York Times columnist David Brooks.

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Success

Jun 9, 2017 - 00:53:50

Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful. TED speakers include Professor Angela Duckworth, motivational speaker Tony Robbins, HealthTap CEO Ron Gutman, Dirty Jobs host Mike Rowe, and writer Alain de Botton (Original Broadcast Date: November 1, 2013).

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Wired For Altruism

May 26, 2017 - 00:52:31

Helping others feels good, but why do some go farther than others? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about altruism — what motivates us to be altruistic, what limits us and do we ever go too far. TED speakers include psychologist Abigail Marsh, clinical psychologist Cheryl Steed, philosopher Peter Singer, and writer Larissa MacFarquhar.

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Forgiveness

May 12, 2017 - 00:52:48

When loss, violence or betrayal test our willingness to forgive — how do we do it anyway? This hour, TED speakers explore the challenges and benefits of forgiving others and ourselves. TED speakers include Sue Klebold, Thordis Elva, Tom Stranger, and Elizabeth Lesser.

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The Digital Industrial Revolution

Apr 21, 2017 - 00:52:41

As machine learning surpasses human intelligence, where does that leave us? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the exciting and terrifying future of human-robot collaboration.

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Speaking Up

Apr 7, 2017 - 00:53:00

Whether it's asking for a raise or asking for equality, speaking up can be risky — even dangerous. This hour, TED speakers share ideas and stories about taking the crucial step to say something.

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Painfully Funny

Mar 24, 2017 - 00:52:23

Humans have a capacity to laugh even in the hardest of times. This hour, TED speakers describe how they use humor as a weapon and a shield, to ward off doubt, discrimination, and even depression.

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Decisions Decisions Decisions

Mar 10, 2017 - 00:52:51

Whether you're choosing spaghetti sauce or a life partner, making decisions can be paralyzing. This hour, TED speakers explore how we make the choices we make, and how we learn to live with them.

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Spoken And Unspoken

Mar 3, 2017 - 00:53:38

We communicate with each other in all sorts of ways. In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect. (Original Broadcast Date: December 13, 2013).

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The Spirit Of Inquiry

Feb 24, 2017 - 00:52:13

The force behind scientific progress is the simple act of asking questions. This episode, TED speakers explore how a deeper and more humble style of inquiry may help achieve the next big breakthrough.

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Getting Better

Feb 10, 2017 - 00:52:18

We expect a lot of our doctors, but they don't always have the best tools to treat us. This episode, TED speakers explore new ways to think about disease, diagnosis, and the delicate art of healing.

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The Five Senses

Jan 20, 2017 - 00:00:00

The five senses shape all our experience, but we still don't fully understand them. This episode, TED speakers explore how our brains make sense of sensation, and how our minds manufacture "reality."

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Networks

Jan 13, 2017 - 00:53:57

Networks surround and sustain us, in nature, in our bodies, in relationships, in the digital world. This hour, TED speakers explore how we rely on networks and how we have the power to shape them.

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Reconciliation

Dec 16, 2016 - 00:00:00

In a world that seems more divided than ever, how do we begin to find middle ground? This episode, TED speakers on how to look past anger, fear, and even violence to reconcile our differences.

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Giving It Away

Nov 25, 2016 - 00:00:00

In this hour, stories from TED speakers who are "giving it away" in new and surprising ways, and the things that happen in return. (Original broadcast date: May 17, 2013).

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The Food We Eat

Nov 18, 2016 - 00:51:59

Food is more than nourishment. It's a source of pleasure — and guilt — and an agent of change. This episode, TED speakers explore our deep connection to food, and where it's headed.

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Democracy On Trial

Nov 4, 2016 - 00:52:39

Democracy is often hailed as the best form of government. But with a growing sense of distrust, should we rethink the whole system? This hour, TED speakers ask if democracy is truly our best option.

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Toxic

Oct 21, 2016 - 00:51:52

It's an unpleasant thought, but we're exposed to toxins every day. This episode, TED speakers ask: should we accept our toxic world as reality or can we make change?

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Anthropocene

Sep 30, 2016 - 00:52:43

Some scientists say we're in a new geological age where humans are having an unprecedented impact on Earth. This hour, TED speakers ask what this means for the future of our planet, and our species.

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Big Data Revolution

Sep 9, 2016 - 00:52:38

Once invisible details of our lives can now be tracked and turned into data. Will this make life easier or more complicated? This hour, TED speakers imagine how Big Data will reshape our world.

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The Act Of Listening

Sep 2, 2016 - 00:52:32

Listening — to loved ones, strangers, faraway places — is an act of generosity and a source of discovery. In this episode, TED speakers describe how we change when we listen deeply. (Original broadcast date: June 5, 2015).

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Slowing Down

Aug 26, 2016 - 00:52:45

We're always asked to be faster and more precise. But what can we learn from slowing down — even procrastinating? This hour, TED speakers explore why taking it slow is crucial...for all of us.

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Failure Is An Option

Jul 29, 2016 - 00:52:29

Failure can be devastating, but it can also make us stronger and smarter. This week, TED speakers explore how failure clears the way for success, in our everyday work, and our innermost lives.

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The Fountain Of Youth

Jul 22, 2016 - 00:52:48

Aging is inevitable. We can slow it down a little, but could we ever bring it to a grinding halt? In this episode, TED speakers explore how we all might live longer and even better lives. (Original broadcast date: May 22, 2015).

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What Makes Us ... Us

Jul 15, 2016 - 00:52:25

For thousands of years, we've searched to answer the question: Who are we? Today, science has brought us closer than ever to the answer. This hour, TED speakers share ideas on what makes us ... us.

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Animals And Us

Jul 8, 2016 - 00:55:26

Our relationship with animals is complicated: we love and fear them; hunt, consume and protect them. In this hour, TED speakers explore what happens when humans and animals interact. (Original broadcast date: September 5, 2014).

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Growing Up

Jul 1, 2016 - 00:52:54

What makes us who we are? How do parents mold children into who they are? In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our upbringing shapes us. (Original broadcast date: August 1, 2014).

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Nudge

Jun 24, 2016 - 00:52:08

It's hard to change habits, but a gentle push can move us in the right direction. This episode,TED speakers offer deceptively simple "nudges" for managing our kids, our health, and our aspirations.

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Trust and Consequences

Jun 17, 2016 - 00:53:34

Our lives are fueled by trust: in our loved ones, our colleagues, our leaders. But how do we cultivate it, and restore if it's lost? In this episode, TED speakers explore our relationship with trust. (Original broadcast date: May 15, 2015).

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Becoming Wise

Jun 10, 2016 - 00:52:46

We usually get wiser with age, but that doesn't mean we have to grow up to wise up. This hour, TED speakers explore what it means to find wisdom at every stage of life.

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Misconceptions

Jun 3, 2016 - 00:53:03

In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom and reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true. (Original broadcast date: November 15, 2013).

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Podcast Extra: An Interview With TED's Chris Anderson

Jun 1, 2016 - 00:16:05

Guy sits down with TED Curator Chris Anderson to talk about the TED phenomenon and his new book on advice for public speaking.

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Champions

May 27, 2016 - 00:53:22

From Little League to the Olympics, athletic mastery plays a major role in our sense of achievement. This hour, TED speakers explore the minds and bodies of champions who achieve extraordinary feats. (Original broadcast date: July 18, 2014).

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The Power Of Design

May 20, 2016 - 00:59:10

Design is all around us, but much of it could be better, bolder, more elegant. This episode, TED speakers on the essence of good design — in buildings, brands, the digital realm and the natural world.

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Maslow's Human Needs

May 13, 2016 - 00:52:44

Humans need food, sleep, safety, love, purpose. Psychologist Abraham Maslow ordered our needs into a hierarchy. This week, TED speakers explore that spectrum of need, from primal to profound. (Original broadcast date: April 17, 2015).

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The Case For Optimism

May 6, 2016 - 00:52:48

When the future is uncertain, how should we respond? Are we wired to be positive? Or are there real reasons to be optimistic? This hour, TED speakers explore why they believe the future is bright.

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Press Play

Apr 29, 2016 - 00:52:50

In this episode, TED speakers describe how all forms of amusement — from tossing a ball to video games — can make us smarter, saner and more collaborative. (Original broadcast date: March 27, 2015)

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Beyond Tolerance

Apr 22, 2016 - 00:51:55

Most of us were raised to believe that tolerance is a good thing, but is it enough, or just the bare minimum? This hour, TED speakers on how to move beyond tolerance to a place of deeper understanding.

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Solve For X

Apr 15, 2016 - 00:53:26

Math intimidates a lot of us, but it can deliver surprising answers to life's pressing questions. In this episode, TED speakers discuss the elegant simplicity, and giddy complexity, of solving for X (Original broadcast date: March 6, 2015)

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What Is Original?

Apr 8, 2016 - 00:53:21

When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing and riffing make all of us innovators. (Original broadcast date: June 27, 2014)

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Crisis and Response

Apr 1, 2016 - 00:53:16

Moments of crisis can upend our lives, but can also help define them. This episode, TED speakers explore how a quick, compassionate or unexpected response can turn crisis into opportunity.

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The Unknown Brain

Mar 25, 2016 - 00:52:57

The brain can seem as mysterious as a distant galaxy, but scientists are starting to map and manipulate its many regions. In this hour, TED speakers take us on a trip through the human brain. (Original broadcast date: February 20, 2015)

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Hidden

Mar 18, 2016 - 00:52:40

What lies beyond the reach of the naked eye, and how do these hidden forces shape our lives? This hour, TED speakers reveal forgotten cities, underwater canyons, tiny parasites, and a boiling river.

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What We Fear

Mar 11, 2016 - 00:54:31

In this hour, TED speakers explore what it means to be afraid, and how we calm ourselves down — or don't — when we're terrified. (Original broadcast date: May 23, 2014)

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How Things Spread

Mar 4, 2016 - 00:52:56

What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.

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Keeping Secrets

Feb 26, 2016 - 00:52:26

Who should get to keep secrets, and who should demand to know them? In this hour, TED speakers talk about the damage secrets can do, and the shifting roles we play when we keep, or share them. (Original broadcast date: January 23, 2015)

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The Money Paradox

Feb 19, 2016 - 00:52:46

How does money motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money. (Original broadcast date: April 4, 2014)

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To Endure

Feb 11, 2016 - 00:52:31

What allows us to endure our darkest moments? What does it take to show resilience in the face of adversity? In this hour, TED speakers explore the outer limits of inner strength.

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In Search Of

Feb 5, 2016 - 00:53:15

How far would you go to find something that's just out of reach, or maybe not even real? In this hour, TED speakers tell stories about searching for elusive sea creatures and distant aliens. (Original broadcast date: January 9, 2015).

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Rethinking Death

Jan 29, 2016 - 00:53:00

It's hard to accept that everyone eventually dies. How can we better understand death as a part of life? In this episode, TED speakers contemplate the end of life with wisdom and humor.

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7 Deadly Sins

Jan 22, 2016 - 00:52:13

Sinful behavior is human, and nearly impossible to avoid. In this hour, TED speakers talk about the guilty pleasure of behaving badly and the challenge of confronting sin — and avoiding it. (Original broadcast date: February 6, 2015)

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Courage

Jan 15, 2016 - 00:53:05

What does it mean to be courageous? Is it an automatic response or a conscious choice? This hour, TED speakers examine the nature of courage and what it takes to risk everything to do the right thing. (Original broadcast date: December 12, 2014)

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Building Better Cities

Jan 8, 2016 - 00:52:18

Cities are among our greatest experiments in human co-habitation. Do they also hold the answers to some of our biggest problems? This hour, TED speakers explore how cities can change the world.

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What Is Beauty?

Jan 1, 2016 - 00:52:16

TED speakers suggest reasons why humans are hardwired to crave and respond to beauty. (Original broadcast date: April 19, 2013)

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Believers And Doubters

Dec 25, 2015 - 00:51:51

In this hour, TED speakers offer perspectives on belief from all ends of the spectrum, from atheists to the devout. (Original broadcast date: November 22, 2013)

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The Hero's Journey

Dec 18, 2015 - 00:51:39

From the Odyssey, to Robinson Crusoe, to Star Wars — why are we drawn to stories about heroes? And what do they tell us about ourselves? This hour, TED speakers explore what makes a hero's journey.

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Getting Organized

Dec 11, 2015 - 00:53:04

Even the most seemingly chaotic systems have some order to them. This episode, TED speakers explore the inner architecture of living systems, from ant colonies to corporations to social movements. (Original broadcast date: April 24, 2015)

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Just A Little Nicer

Dec 4, 2015 - 00:52:44

Compassion is a universal virtue, but is it innate or taught? Have we lost touch with it? Can we be better at it? In this hour, TED speakers explore compassion: its roots, its meaning and its future. (Original broadcast date: December 19, 2014)

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Disruptive Leadership

Nov 27, 2015 - 00:51:17

Is leadership only reserved for the extraordinary few? Who has what it takes to disrupt the status quo? In this hour, TED speakers share ideas about what it takes to forge a new path. (Original broadcast date: January 17, 2014)

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Adaptation

Nov 20, 2015 - 00:52:02

Humans adapt to physical and creative challenges in remarkable ways. How do we do it, and what happens when we can't? In this episode, TED speakers share inspiring stories about our capacity to adapt.

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Quiet

Nov 13, 2015 - 00:52:03

In this episode, we explore ways to find quiet in our busy lives. How can we step back and make time to reflect in an increasingly distracted and hurried world? (Original broadcast date: November 21, 2014)

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Headspace

Nov 6, 2015 - 00:52:21

Some of our most powerful feelings — stress, depression, despair — are the hardest to understand. This hour, TED speakers challenge assumptions about emotion, disquiet and the essence of well-being.

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Playing With Perceptions

Oct 30, 2015 - 00:53:51

Where do stereotypes come from? Why do some perceptions persist, and is there any truth or value to the assumptions we make? In this hour, TED speakers examine the consequences of stereotypes. (Original broadcast date: November 14, 2014)

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Open Source World

Oct 23, 2015 - 00:52:20

The era of open source has led to countless innovations. When does it work and when is it chaos? In this episode, TED speakers explore how open source is changing how we build, collaborate and govern.

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Simply Happy

Oct 16, 2015 - 00:52:52

We all want to find happiness, but it seems elusive. Can we learn more about happiness through science? Or are there simpler ways to achieve it? In this hour, finding happiness may be simpler than you think. (Original broadcast date: February 14, 2014)

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How It All Began

Oct 9, 2015 - 00:53:16

In this hour, TED speakers explore our origins as a species — who we are, where we come from, where we're headed — and how we're connected to everything that came before us. (Original broadcast date: October 24, 2014)

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The Meaning Of Work

Oct 2, 2015 - 00:52:19

Love it or hate it, most of us have to work for a living. So how can we make work more meaningful? This hour, TED speakers explore our values and motivations when it comes to the workplace.

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The Source Of Creativity

Sep 25, 2015 - 00:53:43

We want to be creative, but channeling our creative impulses is no small feat. Is creativity something we are born with, or can we learn it? In this hour TED speakers examine the mystery of creativity. (Original broadcast date: October 3, 2014)

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Screen Time - Part II

Sep 18, 2015 - 00:52:41

When we go online, we present a digital version of ourselves. How do we transform when we interact inside our screens? In this episode, TED speakers explore the expanding role of our "second selves".

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Screen Time - Part I

Sep 11, 2015 - 01:01:53

It's normal for us to be constantly glued to our screens. So how are they changing us, and how will they shape our future? This hour, TED speakers explore our ambivalent relationships with our screens.

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Unstoppable Learning

Sep 4, 2015 - 00:52:24

Host Guy Raz talks with TED speakers about the different ways babies and children learn — from the womb, to the playground, to the web. (Original broadcast date: May 3, 2013)

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Everything Is Connected

Aug 28, 2015 - 00:52:57

In this hour, TED speakers explain how everything in nature is connected, and how we can restore its delicate balance. (Original broadcast date: September 27, 2013)

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Peering Into Space

Aug 21, 2015 - 00:52:59

This hour, we'll hear from TED speakers who share an infectious sense of wonder and curiosity about our place in the universe and what lies beyond our skies. (Original broadcast date: March 8, 2013)

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Amateur Hour

Aug 14, 2015 - 00:52:22

What does it take to survive, even thrive, when you're a complete amateur? This hour, TED speakers share stories of plunging - or being plunged - into new situations and emerging as experts.

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The Hackers

Aug 7, 2015 - 00:00:00

In this hour, TED speakers dare to hack the brain, the climate, and the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world. (Original broadcast date: August 9, 2013)

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Fighting Cancer

Jul 31, 2015 - 00:52:28

Cancer is merciless. It can strike any time, spread without warning, and return unannounced. In this hour, TED speakers reframe not only how we treat cancer but how we can live with it and survive it.

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Transformation

Jul 24, 2015 - 00:53:47

Are we simply the sum of our experiences? Or can we choose our own path? In this hour, TED speakers share stories of undergoing remarkable transformations despite extraordinary challenges. (Original broadcast date: September 19, 2014)

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Finite

Jul 17, 2015 - 00:52:29

In a world with limited resources, can we find ways to salvage what's disappearing? Can we innovate our way out of a finite landscape? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about living with less.

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Why We Collaborate

Jul 10, 2015 - 00:53:15

In this hour, TED speakers unravel ideas behind the mystery of mass collaborations that build a better world. (Original broadcast date: July 12, 2013)

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Do We Need Humans?

Jun 26, 2015 - 00:51:59

In this episode, TED speakers consider the promises and perils of our relationship with technology. (Original broadcast date: March 15, 2013)

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Shifting Time

Jun 19, 2015 - 00:51:15

We live our lives by the calendar and the clock, but time is also an abstraction, even an illusion. In this hour, TED speakers explore how our sense of time changes depending on who and where we are.

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From Curiosity To Discovery

Jun 12, 2015 - 00:52:04

Why do some people spend years trying to answer a single question, or even risk their lives to discover something new? In this hour, TED speakers describe how curiosity leads to unexpected places. (Original broadcast date: September 12, 2014)

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The Act of Listening

Jun 5, 2015 - 00:51:08

Listening — to loved ones, strangers, faraway places — is an act of generosity and a source of discovery. In this episode, TED speakers describe how we change when we listen deeply.

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Animals and Us

May 29, 2015 - 00:54:25

Our relationship with animals is complicated: we love and fear them; hunt, consume, and protect them. In this hour, TED speakers explore what happens when humans and animals interact. (Original broadcast date: September 5, 2014)

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The Fountain of Youth

May 22, 2015 - 00:51:16

Aging is inevitable. We can slow it down a little, but could we ever bring it to a grinding halt? In this episode, TED speakers explore how we all might live longer and even better lives.

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Trust and Consequences

May 15, 2015 - 00:52:31

Our lives are fueled by trust: in our loved ones, our colleagues, our leaders. But how do we cultivate it, and restore if it's lost? In this episode, TED speakers explore our relationship with trust.

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Identities

May 8, 2015 - 00:53:01

Is identity assigned at birth? Shaped by circumstance? Or is it something we choose? This hour, TED speakers describe their journeys to answer the question: who am I? (Original broadcast date: October 11, 2013)

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Getting Organized

Apr 24, 2015 - 00:51:34

Even the most seemingly chaotic systems are organized. On this episode, TED speakers explore the inner architecture of living systems, from ant colonies to corporations to social movements.

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Framing The Story

Apr 10, 2015 - 00:51:44

Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world. (Original broadcast date: June 7, 2013)

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Why We Lie

Apr 3, 2015 - 00:52:15

Let's face it: people lie. We lie to each other and to ourselves. Is there a deeper reason why we do it? In this episode, TED speakers deconstruct the hard truths of deception. (Original broadcast date: June 20, 2014)

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What Is Original? (R)

Mar 20, 2015 - 00:52:50

Even the most original ideas are essentially remixes. When is copying flattery, when is it thievery, and when is it sheer genius? In this hour, TED speakers explore how sampling, borrowing, and riffing make all of us innovators. Sampling music isn't about "hijacking nostalgia wholesale," says DJ Mark Ronson. It's about inserting yourself into the narrative of a song while also pushing that story forward. Filmmaker Kirby Ferguson says nothing is original and that our most celebrated creators steal ideas — and transform them into something new. Clothing designs aren't protected by copyright --and the industry benefits by being more innovative, says Johanna Blakley. People often credit their ideas to individual "Eureka!" moments. But writer Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story.

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Spoken And Unspoken (R)

Mar 13, 2015 - 00:52:49

We communicate with each other in all sorts of ways, spoken and unspoken. But how did the origins of language influence action, and can words actually change human behavior, even alter the course of history? In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect. Linguist John McWhorter says that texting has come of age with such speed and force that it's created an entirely new language within a generation. Biologist Mark Pagel believes our complex language system is a piece of "social technology", simply created to help us get things done. Teacher Phuc Tran tells a personal story of how being caught in a world between the subjunctive and indicative tense — yes, grammar — helped him find his identity. Etymologist Mark Forsyth shares the surprising backstory of the word "president." Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how "power posing" can affect our brains, and might even have an impact on our success.

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Success (R)

Feb 27, 2015 - 00:51:52

Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful. Life coach Tony Robbins describes why failure should not be an option. Psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth says "grit", not IQ, is the new predictor of success. Mike Rowe encourages us not to follow our passion. Ron Gutman shares some compelling research on the hidden power of smiling. And writer Alain de Botton shares a fascinating view about the American paradigm for success and failure.

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How We Love (R)

Feb 13, 2015 - 00:51:50

Love is instinctive and essential. We need it to keep our species going, to survive childhood, to create bonds with other people. But what is it that brings certain people together? In this hour, TED speakers examine the mystery of connection and relationships. Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating, until she effectively hacked the system. Anthropologist Helen Fisher questions what happens in our brains when we're in love. Therapist Esther Perel says a good relationship draws on both security and surprise. Writer Jeffrey Kluger explores the profound life-long bond between siblings. Angela Patton tells the story of a unique father-daughter dance.

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Seven Deadly Sins

Feb 6, 2015 - 00:51:56

Seven TED speakers muse about the seven deadly sins: Psychologist Christopher Ryan says human beings are sexual omnivores, and a more nuanced understanding of fidelity may tamp down our shame about lust.  Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett explains how his city sidestepped gluttony and collectively dropped one million pounds. Activist Dave Meslin says even though we’re apathetic about local politics, we’re hardly sloths. Dr. Gary Slutkin tracks violence, the destructive sibling of wrath. He says if we think of violence as a contagious disease, we can better contain it. Nick Hanauer is a rich guy with at least five houses, but is he greedy? He argues taxing the very rich and increasing the minimum wage would be good for everyone. Editor Parul Sehgal says literature would hardly exist without the “grim thrill” of envy. Jeopardy Know-it-All Ken Jennings reveals how losing to a supercomputer crushed his pride.

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What We Fear (R)

Jan 30, 2015 - 00:51:55

Human beings have a fine-tuned sense of fear. But how do we distinguish between fear and danger? How do we decide which fears are rational and irrational? In this hour, TED speakers explore what it means to be afraid, and how we calm ourselves down — or don’t — when we’re terrified. Astronaut and retired colonel Chris Hadfield discusses how to prepare your mind for the unexpected, and the worst. Through the story of the whaleship Essex, novelist Karen Thompson Walker describes how our most vivid fears are often not the most realistic. Folk singer Joe Kowan talks about the visceral, body-hijacking experience he feels when he’s performing in front of an audience, and how a song helped him cope with stage fright. Illusionist and endurance artist David Blaine reveals how he has made a career out of fearlessly performing death-defying feats. Philosopher Stephen Cave delves into the simple question: Why are human beings afraid to die?

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Brand Over Brain (R)

Jan 16, 2015 - 00:00:00

Brands help us assign value to almost everything we buy. But is there a way to know the difference between real and created value? In this episode, TED speakers explore the seductive power of brands. Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock tells the story of his quest to make a completely sponsored film — about sponsorship. Psychologist Paul Bloom argues that our beliefs about the history of an object change how we perceive it. Consultant Joseph Pine says we’ll pay more for an experience that feels “real.”  Marketer Rory Sutherland explains how rebranding changed the potato forever.

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Misconceptions (R)

Jan 2, 2015 - 00:00:00

There are some truths that we believe in wholeheartedly — but what if we’re completely wrong? Once we separate fact from fiction, how do our perceptions change?  In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true. Author Malcolm Gladwell reveals an alternative account of David and Goliath that flips the story on its head. Reporter Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the actual origins of Chinese-American food. Ecologist Allan Savory counters everything conventional wisdom tells us about how grasslands lose their life to desertification. Reporter Leslie T. Chang debunks how we assume Chinese factory workers feel. Psychologist Barry Schwartz says having more options doesn't make us happier — it actually paralyzes us.

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Memory Games (R)

Dec 26, 2014 - 00:00:00

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. When we tap into our memories, where is the line between fact and fiction? How does our memory play tricks on us, and how can we train it to be more accurate? In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's. Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser argues that in a criminal trial, even close-up eyewitnesses can create "memories" they may not have seen. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman explains how our experiences and our memories perceive happiness differently. Writer Joshua Foer shows how anyone can achieve amazing feats of memory, including him.

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The Money Paradox (R)

Dec 5, 2014 - 00:00:00

What does money tell us about human nature? How does it motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? In this hour, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money. Psychologist Laurie Santos studies human irrationality by observing how primates make decisions — including some not-so-savvy money choices their human relatives often make. Behavioral economist Keith Chen says languages that don’t have a future tense strongly correlate with higher savings. Social psychologist Paul Piff describes how almost anyone’s behavior can change when they’re made to feel rich. Career analyst and writer Daniel Pink explains why traditional rewards like money aren't always successful motivators. Social scientist Michael Norton researches how money can buy happiness — the key is social spending that benefits not just you, but other people.  

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To the Edge (R)

Nov 28, 2014 - 00:00:00

Some people might only dream of adventure, but for others, there’s no other option but to explore the most extreme places on Earth. From the deepest caves to rough oceans, from the North Pole to dizzying heights on a high wire  -- what drives adventurers to constantly push to the brink of human endurance? In this hour, TED speakers share their experiences of going to the edge of our world. Arctic explorer Ben Saunders recounts his harrowing solo ski trek to the North Pole. Engineer and daredevil caver Bill Stone pushes the frontier to the remotest depths of the Earth. Roz Savage quit her high-powered job to become an ocean rower. High-wire artist Philippe Petit tells the amazing story of how he walked between the Twin Towers.

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Playing with Perceptions

Nov 14, 2014 - 00:00:00

Where do stereotypes come from? Is there any truth or value to the assumptions we make about each other? Why do some perceptions persist, and can they be overcome? In this hour, TED speakers examine the roots and consequences of stereotypes. Playwright and performer Sarah Jones explores the fine line between stereotyping and celebrating ethnicity. Iranian-American comedian and actor Maz Jobrani talks about a comic’s role in challenging stereotypes. Artist Hetain Patel describes how first impressions can be deceptive and why we need to think more deeply about identity. Educator and poet Jamila Lyiscott unpacks the three distinct dialects of English she speaks — and what it really means to be called “articulate.” Psychologist Paul Bloom explains why prejudice is natural, rational and even moral — the key is to understand why we depend on it, and recognize when it leads us astray.  

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Solving It (R)

Nov 7, 2014 - 00:00:00

There are problems affecting big parts of our lives that seem intractable. From politics, to healthcare, to law and the justice system — some things just don’t seem to work as they should. In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas on how to solve the seemingly impossible. Attorney Philip K. Howard argues the U.S. has become a legal minefield and we need to simplify our laws. Legal scholar Lawrence Lessig says corruption is at the heart of American politics and issues a bipartisan call for change. Health advocate Rebecca Onie describes how our healthcare system can be restructured to not just treat — but prevent — illness. Lawyer Bryan Stevenson explains how America’s criminal justice system works against the poor and people of color, and how we can address it.

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NPR
Extrasensory (R)

Oct 31, 2014 - 00:51:21

In this hour, TED speakers question whether we can experience the world more deeply by not only extending our senses — but going beyond them. Color blind artist Neil Harbisson can "hear" colors, even those beyond the range of sight. Physician and engineer Todd Kuiken builds prosthetic arms that connect with the human nervous system — improving motion, control and even feeling. Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can’t speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies who they are. Sound expert Julian Treasure says we are losing our listening in a louder world. He shares ways to re-tune our ears for conscious listening — to other people and the world around us.   

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NPR
The Next Greatest Generation? (R)

Oct 17, 2014 - 00:00:00

Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y, or the Me Generation, one thing's for certain: today's generation of young people will change the world. But how different is this hyper-connected generation from its predecessors? And what will be its legacy? In this hour, we hear from TED speakers searching to define themselves and their generation. Demographer Neil Howe coined the term “Millennial” in 1991, and offers perspective on the now-loaded term. Activist Natalie Warne calls on young people to find their passion, chase after it, and not let age stop them from changing the world. Psychologist Meg Jay tells twentysomethings how to reclaim adulthood before it’s too late. Charlie Hoehn explains how he built a career on his own terms at the height of the economic recession. YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca describes how this generation is using technology to warp the way we consume media. And teenager and RookieMag.com editor-in-chief Tavi Gevinson talks about the need for an unapologetically uncertain, complex idea of feminism for today's teenage girls.

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NPR
Predicting the Future (R)

Oct 10, 2014 - 00:00:00

Visions of the future don’t just have to come from science fiction. There’s very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future be like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how our future lives might look. Technology leader Nicholas Negroponte looks back on predictions he made in 1984, with surprising accuracy. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon says in the future, we’ll be able to grow replacement organs. Entrepreneur Richard Resnick says faster genome sequencing will revolutionize how we treat disease. Global security consultant Marc Goodman explains how advancing technology will change how we fight crime. GPS expert Todd Humphreys forecasts the future of geo-locators and how it will change our notions of privacy. Also, Sebastian Thrun says we will see more driverless cars on the road in the next decade, and soon traffic jams and accidents will be a thing of the past.

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NPR
The Source of Creativity

Oct 3, 2014 - 00:00:00

Everyone wants to be creative. But channeling your creative impulses is no small feat. Is creativity something you are born with or can you learn it? In this hour, TED speakers examine the mystery of creativity. After a nasty bout of writer’s block that stretched on for nearly a decade, Sting found inspiration by channeling the stories of the shipyard workers he knew from his childhood. What happens in the brain during musical improv? Researcher Charles Limb scanned the brains of jazz musicians to find out. Sir Ken Robinson makes a case for creating an education system that nurtures — rather than stifles — creativity. Writer Elizabeth Gilbert muses on the impossible things we expect from artists and geniuses.

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NPR
The End of Privacy (R)

Sep 26, 2014 - 00:00:00

Everyone expects a degree of privacy. But who holds the reins over our personal information? And does it matter if it’s collected by government, by a search engine, or if we willingly give it away? In this hour, TED speakers explore ideas about our changing notions of privacy, the consequences and benefits. When Hasan Elahi’s name was mistakenly added to the U.S. government’s watch list, he fought the assault on his privacy by turning his life inside-out for the world to see. Hacker and security expert Mikko Hyppönen says virtually every international internet user is being watched — and he makes the case for privacy in the age of government surveillance. Former U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer Beth Noveck shares her vision of practical openness – connecting bureaucracies to citizens, and creating a truly participatory democracy. Health IT expert John Wilbanks explores whether the desire to protect privacy is slowing research, and if opening up medical data could create a wave of health care innovation.Behavioral economist Alessandro Acquisti explains how everyday decisions contribute to blurring the line between our public and private lives.

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NPR
From Curiosity to Discovery

Sep 12, 2014 - 00:00:00

Why do some people spend years trying to answer a single question; or even risk their lives to discover something new? In this hour, TED speakers explore how curiosity leads to unexpected places. Director James Cameron's blockbuster films create unreal worlds. He reveals his childhood fascinations and how they fueled the passion behind his movies. Designer Thomas Thwaites explains what compelled him to build a toaster, literally from the ground up. Geneticist Wendy Chung describes what it’s like to chip away at the mysteries of autism, and the excitement of uncovering tiny but critical clues.  Biologist Nathan Wolfe says the unseeable world of microbes is fertile ground for new discoveries.  Mythbusters co-host Adam Savage talks about three people who inspired him to be curious: his dad, a former Earth Science teacher, and physicist Richard Feynman.

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NPR
Unstoppable Learning (R)

Aug 29, 2014 - 00:50:35

Learning is an integral part of human nature. But why do we — as adults — assume learning must be taught, tested and reinforced? Why do we put so much effort in making kids think and act like us? In this hour, TED speakers explore the different ways babies and children learn on their own — from the womb, to the playground, to the web. Education researcher Sugata Mitra explains how he brought self-supervised access to the web for children in India’s slums and villages — with results that have made him rethink teaching. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul discusses how fetuses begin taking cues from the outside world while still in the womb. Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik argues that like scientists, babies and young children follow a sophisticated systematic process of exploration when they play. Veteran teacher Rita Pierson says children need relationships and human connection in order to be inspired to learn. Sugata Mitra returns later in the episode to talk about his vision to build a school in a cloud where children drive a new kind of self-organized classroom.

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NPR
Making Mistakes (R)

Aug 22, 2014 - 00:00:00

We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen. And when they do, how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those darker moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head on. Dr. Brian Goldman tells a profound story about the first big mistake he made in the ER, and questions medicine's culture of denial. Professor Brené Brown explains how important it is to confront shame. Also, jazz composer Stefon Harris argues that a lot of our actions are seen as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately. Plus, Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, tells the story of two unexpected collaborators, and how good disagreement is central to progress.

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NPR
Podcast Extra: Live at TED 2014

Aug 20, 2014 - 00:37:17

This recording of "Beauty and the Brain," a session hosted by Guy Raz at TED 2014, brings popular speakers back to the TED stage with updates on their work and personal lives.  Tierney Thys talks about how being in the natural world engages your brain; Dan Gilbert discusses why we so often make decisions that our future selves regret; Jane McGonigal explores a video game that is better than morphine at relieving pain; seventeen-year-old Taylor Wilson details his progress on the nuclear reactor he built in his garage; and Jill Bolte Taylor, the neuro-scientist who lived through a stroke, explains how her life has changed since her TED Talk went viral. 

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NPR
Simply Happy (R)

Aug 15, 2014 - 00:00:00

We all want to find happiness, but it seems elusive. Can we learn more about happiness through science? Or are there simpler ways to achieve it? Host Guy Raz feels happy listening to Pharrell’s song “Happy”, so Guy asked Pharrell to share his ideas on happiness. Then we hear from five TED speakers who contemplate different paths to finding happiness. Researcher Matt Killingsworth says we're often happiest when we're lost in the moment. Journalist Carl Honore believes our society's emphasis on speed erodes our quality of life. Writer Graham Hill makes the case for taking up less space.  Psychologist Dan Gilbert challenges the idea that we’ll be miserable if we don’t get what we want.  Brother David Steindl-Rast reflects on slowing down, looking where you’re going, and being grateful.

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NPR
The Violence Within Us (R)

Aug 8, 2014 - 00:00:00

Violence and brutality are grim realities of life. So why are some people violent, and others aren’t? Are some of us born that way, or can anyone be pushed into committing acts of cruelty? What would it take for an ordinary person to become violent? In this hour, TED speakers explore the sinister side of human nature, and whether we’re all capable of violence. Psychologist Philip Zimbardo tells the story of his notorious Stanford Prison experiment and how easy it is for people to turn violent. Neuroscientist Jim Fallon uncovers the wiring of a psychopathic killer. Writer Leslie Morgan Steiner tells the harrowing story of her abusive relationship, and shares why victims of domestic violence often don’t leave. Psychology professor Steven Pinker charts the whole of human history, and says we are living in the most peaceful time in our existence.

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NPR
Disruptive Leadership (R)

Jul 25, 2014 - 00:00:00

Is leadership only reserved for the extraordinary few? Who has what it takes to disrupt the status quo? In this hour, TED speakers share ideas about what it takes to forge a new path. Four-star general Stanley McChrystal recounts some tough lessons about leadership he gained from the front lines. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg gets to the bottom line for women who want to lead. Bunker Roy created a school in India that equips rural women for leadership by training them to become solar engineers, artisans, dentists and doctors. Drew Dudley calls on us to celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives. Seth Godin believes the Internet gives ordinary people the power to lead.

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NPR
The Hackers (R)

Jul 11, 2014 - 00:50:51

Science and technology now allow us to "hack" solutions to the biggest challenges of our time. But how far is too far? And what are the consequences of these hacks? In this hour, we hear stories from TED speakers who dare to hack the brain, the climate, and even the animal kingdom in hopes of creating a better world. Computer security expert Mikko Hyppönen describes how he discovered the first PC virus and what he learned about protecting the Internet today. Environmentalist Stewart Brand says we now have the technology to bring back some of the species that humanity has wiped out. Climate scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and surprising way to address climate change. Inventor Jay Silver encourages everyone to play with the world around us. Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano talks about dramatic findings in deep brain stimulation.

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Peering Into Space (R)

Jul 3, 2014 - 00:00:00

Gazing up at the night sky is simultaneously humbling and utterly thrilling. This hour, we’ll hear from TED speakers who share an infectious sense of wonder and curiosity about our place in the universe and what lies beyond our skies. Phil Plait breaks down how we can defend Earth from an asteroid. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute explains why it’s crucial for humans here on earth to continue searching for sentient beings in the cosmos. Physicist Brian Greene unravels the strange tale of dark matter and why our universe may be one of many in the “multiverse.”

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NPR
Overcoming (R)

Jun 13, 2014 - 00:00:00

  We all have our struggles, whether they be mental, physical, or social. But what is it that makes some of us keep trying and striving to overcome despite the odds? In this hour, TED speakers tell their stories about overcoming a weakness and turning it into a strength. Temple Grandin talks about how she struggled with autism for years until she realized that her ability to “think in pictures” allows her to solve problems that many others might miss. Shane Koyczan describes being tormented endlessly by bullies, but when he turned to spoken word poetry as an adult, he found a community of fans eager to embrace him for his anti-bullying message. Eleanor Longden recounts how her life was spiraling out of control when she was diagnosed with schizophrenia, hospitalized, and drugged — until she learned to listen to and live with her voices. Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting to continue her education, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.

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NPR
Getting There

Jun 6, 2014 - 00:00:00

Our daily lives depend on travel: walking, biking, driving, flying. In the future, we’ll make tough compromises and bold leaps of faith to travel smarter, cleaner, and faster. In this hour, TED speakers reimagine the future of getting there.  Explorer Bertrand Piccard explains why he’s aiming to carry out an unprecedented mission: to circle the planet in a solar-powered airplane. Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford describes how we can create a green future of smart roads and smart cars. Zipcar co-founder Robin Chase makes the case for car-sharing as the solution to global gridlock. Former New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan says cities can tackle the challenges of tomorrow by completely re-imagining our streets today. Entrepreneur Richard Branson shares his vision for private, commercial space travel.

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NPR
Haves and Have-Nots (R)

May 30, 2014 - 00:00:00

Income inequality is at an all-time high between the haves and the have-nots. But does the poverty gap have to be so wide, and can it potentially be eliminated altogether? In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas about inequality, and new ways we might achieve prosperity for all.  Ernesto Sirolli recounts how well-intentioned aid programs can go awry; he says the first step to addressing poverty might be to “shut up and listen.” Author and politician Chrystia Freeland charts the rise of today’s billionaire plutocrats, and wonders what concentrated super-wealth means for the rest of us. Historian Niall Ferguson explains why, when it comes to amassing wealth, it’s been the West versus the rest for the past 500 years. Ghanaian economist George Ayittey says that when it comes to Africa, it’s up to a new generation to bring about accountability. Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, discusses groundbreaking work that connects the poor to the global economy.

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Why We Collaborate (R)

May 16, 2014 - 00:00:00

"The world has over a trillion hours a year of free time to commit to shared projects," says professor Clay Shirky. But what motivates dozens, thousands, even millions of people to come together on the Internet and commit their time to a project for free?  What is the key to making a successful collaboration work? In this hour, TED speakers unravel ideas behind the mystery of mass collaborations that build a better world. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales explains what drives people everywhere to contribute to the self-organizing online encyclopedia. Computer programmer Luis von Ahn builds systems that combine humans and computers to help digitize books and translate the web. Social media guru Clay Shirky says when we contribute to the web, we’re building a better world. Software entrepreneur Jason Fried thinks collaboration is key to productivity, as long as we do away with meetings. And coder Jennifer Pahlka believes the government be run like the Internet: permissionless and open. 

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NPR
Brand Over Brain

May 9, 2014 - 00:00:00

Brands help us assign value to almost everything we buy. But is there a way to know the difference between real and created value? In this episode, TED speakers explore the seductive power of brands. Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock tells the story of his quest to make a completely sponsored film-- about sponsorship. Psychologist Paul Bloom argues that our beliefs about the history of an object change how we perceive it. Consultant Joseph Pine says we’ll pay more for an experience that feels “real.” Marketer Rory Sutherland explains how rebranding changed the potato forever.

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Spoken and Unspoken (R)

May 2, 2014 - 00:00:00

We communicate with each other in all sorts of ways, spoken and unspoken. But how did the origins of language influence action, and can words actually change human behavior, even alter the course of history?  In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect.  Linguist John McWhorter says that texting has come of age with such speed and force that it's created an entirely new language within a generation. Biologist Mark Pagel believes our complex language system is a piece of "social technology", simply created to help us get things done. Teacher Phuc Tran tells a personal story of how being caught in a world between the subjunctive and indicative tense — yes, grammar — helped him find his identity. Etymologist Mark Forsyth shares the surprising back story of the word "president."  Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how “power posing” can affect our brains, and might even have an impact on our success.

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NPR
How We Love

Apr 25, 2014 - 00:50:18

Love is instinctive and essential. We need it to keep our species going, to survive childhood, to create bonds with other people. But what is it that brings certain people together?  In this hour, TED speakers examine the mystery of connection and relationships. Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating, until she effectively hacked the system.  Anthropologist Helen Fisher questions what happens in our brains when we're in love. Therapist Esther Perel says a good relationship draws on both security and surprise. Writer Jeffrey Kluger explores the profound life-long bond between siblings. Angela Patton tells the story of a unique father-daughter dance.

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Believers and Doubters (R)

Apr 18, 2014 - 00:50:42

Why do some of us believe, and some of us don’t? Can our doubts bring our beliefs into sharper focus? Do we all need to believe in something, and to seek meaning by creating rituals, myths and symbols? And what is the difference between belief and faith? In this hour, TED speakers offer personal perspectives on belief from all ends of the spectrum, from ardent atheists to the devout faithful. Anne Graham Lotz, the daughter of Billy Graham, reflects on her father’s faith and lifelong devotion to God. Writer Lesley Hazleton calls for a new appreciation of doubt as the foundation of faith. Julia Sweeney talks about how two Mormon missionaries made her completely rethink her own beliefs. Alain de Botton says "Atheism 2.0" could satisfy our human need for connection and ritual. Devdutt Pattanaik examines the East vs West approach to life through the lens of mythology.

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NPR
Framing the Story (R)

Apr 11, 2014 - 00:50:43

Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. Stories affirm who we are, and allow us to experience the similarities between ourselves and others, real or imagined. Stories help us make meaning of our lives. In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world. Novelist Tracy Chevalier explains how she discovers a compelling story from inside a painting. Graphic designer Chip Kidd creates “visual haikus” — book covers that, in a single image, tell the story inside. Writer Chimamanda Adichie warns that if we hear only a single story about another person, we risk a critical misunderstanding. Plus, filmmaker Andrew Stanton says good storytelling is starting at the end and working back to the beginning.

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Solving It

Mar 14, 2014 - 00:00:00

There are problems affecting big parts of our lives that seem intractable. From politics, to health care, to law and the justice system — some things just don’t seem to work as they should. In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas on how to solve the seemingly impossible. Attorney Philip K. Howard argues the U.S. has become a legal minefield and we need to simplify our laws. Legal scholar Lawrence Lessig says corruption is at the heart of American politics and issues a bipartisan call for change. Health advocate Rebecca Onie describes how our health care system can be restructured to not just treat — but prevent — illness. Lawyer Bryan Stevenson explains how America’s criminal justice system works against the poor and people of color, and how we can address it.

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NPR
Extrasensory

Mar 7, 2014 - 00:00:00

In this hour, TED speakers question whether we can experience the world more deeply by not only extending our senses — but going beyond them. Color blind artist Neil Harbisson can "hear" colors, even those beyond the range of sight. Physician and engineer Todd Kuiken builds prosthetic arms that connect with the human nervous system — improving motion, control and even feeling. Speech scientist Rupal Patel creates customized synthetic voices that enable people who can’t speak to communicate in a unique voice that embodies who they are. Sound expert Julian Treasure says we are losing our listening in a louder world. He shares ways to retune our ears for conscious listening — to other people and the world around us.

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NPR
Do We Need Humans? (R)

Feb 28, 2014 - 00:00:00

We've been promised a future where robots will be our friends, and technology will make life’s daily chores as easy as flipping a switch. But are we ready for how those innovations will change us as humans? In this episode, TED speakers consider the promises and perils of our relationship with technology. Psychologist Sherry Turkle looks at how devices and online personas are redefining human connection. Robotics engineer Cynthia Breazeal talks about building robots that teach, learn, and play. Research Scientist Andrew McAfee examines how technology affects the labor market, today and in the future. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are data points, and calls for a return to the traditional physical exam. (Rebroadcast)

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NPR
Everything is Connected

Feb 7, 2014 - 00:00:00

Every species plays a crucial role in our natural world. But when humans tinker with the equation, a chain reaction can cause entire ecosystems to break down. In this hour, TED speakers explain how everything is connected in nature, with some bold ideas about how we can restore the delicate balance and bring disappearing ecosystems back. Journalist George Monbiot wants us to "rewild" — allowing creatures to reclaim their lost habitats. Jane Poynter lived for two years in Biosphere 2, where the connection among living things was often fragile and at risk of breaking down. Sound recordist Bernie Krause helps us hear the signs of vanishing ecosystems. And bee researcher Marla Spivak explains why bee colonies in the U.S. have been declining for decades. (Rebroadcast)

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NPR
The End of Privacy

Jan 31, 2014 - 00:00:00

Everyone expects a degree of privacy. But who holds the reins over our personal information? And does it matter if it’s collected by government, by a search engine, or if we willingly give it away? In this hour, TED speakers explore ideas about our changing notions of privacy, the consequences and benefits. When Hasan Elahi’s name was mistakenly added to the U.S. government’s watch list, he fought the assault on his privacy by turning his life inside-out for the world to see. Hacker and security expert Mikko Hyppönen says virtually every international internet user is being watched — and he makes the case for privacy in the age of government surveillance. Former U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer Beth Noveck shares her vision of practical openness – connecting bureaucracies to citizens, and creating a truly participatory democracy. Health IT expert John Wilbanks explores whether the desire to protect privacy is slowing research, and if opening up medical data could create a wave of health care innovation. Behavioral economist Alessandro Acquisti explains how everyday decisions contribute to blurring the line between our public and private lives.

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NPR
Predicting the Future

Jan 24, 2014 - 00:00:00

Visions of the future don’t just have to come from science fiction. There’s very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future look like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how our future lives might look. Technology leader Nicholas Negroponte looks back on predictions he made in 1984, with surprising accuracy. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon says in the future, we’ll be able to grow replacement organs. Entrepreneur Richard Resnick says faster genome sequencing will revolutionize how we treat disease. Global security consultant Marc Goodman explains how advancing technology will change how we fight crime. GPS expert Todd Humphreys forecasts the future of geo-locators and how it will change our notions of privacy. Also, Sebastian Thrun says we will see more driverless cars on the road in the next decade, and soon traffic jams and accidents will be a thing of the past. (Rebroadcast)

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NPR
The Next Greatest Generation?

Jan 10, 2014 - 00:00:00

Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y, or the Me Generation, one thing's for certain: this generation of young people will change the world. But how different is this hyper-connected generation from its predecessors? And what will be its legacy? In this hour, we hear from TED speakers searching to define themselves and their generation. Demographer Neil Howe coined the term “Millennial” in 1991, and offers perspective on the now loaded term. Activist Natalie Warne calls on young people to find their passion, chase after it, and not let age stop them from changing the world. Psychologist Meg Jay tells twentysomethings how to reclaim adulthood before it’s too late. Charlie Hoehn explains how he built a career on his own terms at the height of the economic recession. YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca describes how this generation is using technology to completely change the way we consume media. Teenager and RookieMag.com editor-in-chief Tavi Gevinson talks about the need for an unapologetically uncertain, complex face for feminism and for teenage girls. (Rebroadcast)

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NPR
Overcoming

Jan 3, 2014 - 00:00:00

We all have our struggles, whether they be mental, physical, or social. But what is it that makes some of us keep trying and striving to overcome despite the odds? In this hour, TED speakers tell their stories about overcoming a weakness and turning it into a strength. Temple Grandin talks about how she struggled with autism for years until she realized that her ability to “think in pictures” allows her to solve problems that many others might miss. Shane Koyczan describes being tormented endlessly by bullies, but when he turned to spoken word poetry as an adult, he found a community of fans eager to embrace him for his anti-bullying message. Eleanor Longden recounts how her life was spiraling out of control when she was diagnosed with schizophrenia, hospitalized, and drugged — until she learned to listen to and live with her voices. Kakenya Ntaiya tells the fearless story of challenging ingrained traditions, insisting to continue her education, and becoming the first girl to leave her Maasai village for college.

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NPR
Rebroadcast: What Is Beauty?

Dec 27, 2013 - 00:00:00

In this TED Radio Hour, we'll try to seduce you with new ideas about beauty. Philosopher Denis Dutton and psychologist Nancy Etcoff take us back in time to the primordial reasons why we all share a common taste for beauty.  Fashion model Cameron Russell walks us down the runway of beauty's perilous side. Civic leader Bill Strickland transforms inner city youth by adorning arts education centers with beauty of every shape and form.  And designer Richard Seymour believes we do not recognize beauty until we know the story behind it. 

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NPR
Rebroadcast: Giving It Away

Dec 20, 2013 - 00:00:00

You can give away almost anything — your time, money, food, your ideas. Giving helps define who we are and helps us connect with others. And thanks to the internet and a rise in social consciousness, there’s been a seismic shift not only in what we’re giving, but how. In this hour, stories from TED speakers who are “giving it away” in new and surprising ways, and the things that happen in return. Firefighter Mark Bezos tells a story of an act of heroism that didn't go as expected, but ended up teaching him an important lesson. Gardener Ron Finley wants to help make his community in South Central LA more healthy, by letting people take fruit and vegetables from his roadside gardens. Activist Dan Pallotta calls out the double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities. And musician Amanda Palmer tells us how she developed a more trusting relationship with her fans by not charging for her music.

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NPR
Spoken and Unspoken

Dec 13, 2013 - 00:00:00

We communicate with each other in all sorts of ways, spoken and unspoken. In this hour, TED speakers reflect on how our words and methods of communication affect us, more than you might expect. Linguist John McWhorter says texting has come of age with such speed and force that it's created an entirely new language within a generation. Biologist Mark Pagel believes our complex language system is a piece of "social technology", simply created to help us get things done. Teacher Phuc Tran tells a personal story of how being caught in a world between the subjunctive and indicative tense — yes, grammar — helped him find his identity. Etymologist Mark Forsyth shares the surprising back story of the word "president." Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains how body language, like “power posing”, can affect our brains, and might even have an impact on our success.

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NPR
Rebroadcast: Memory Games

Nov 29, 2013 - 00:00:00

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. When we tap into our memories, where is the line between fact and fiction? How does our memory play tricks on us, and how can we train it to be more accurate? In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's. Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser argues that in a criminal trial, even close-up eyewitnesses can create "memories" they may not have seen. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman explains how our experiences and our memories perceive happiness differently. Writer Joshua Foer shows how anyone can achieve amazing feats of memory, including him.

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NPR
Believers and Doubters

Nov 22, 2013 - 00:00:00

Why do some of us believe, and some of us don’t? Can our doubts bring our beliefs into sharper focus? Do we all need to believe in something, and to seek meaning by creating rituals, myths and symbols? And what is the difference between belief and faith? In this hour, TED speakers offer personal perspectives on belief from all ends of the spectrum, from ardent atheists to the devout faithful. Anne Graham Lotz, the daughter of Billy Graham, reflects on her father’s faith and lifelong devotion to God. Writer Lesley Hazleton calls for a new appreciation of doubt as the foundation of faith. Julia Sweeney talks about how two Mormon missionaries made her completely rethink her own beliefs. Alain de Botton says "Atheism 2.0" could satisfy our human need for connection and ritual. Devdutt Pattanaik examines the East vs West approach to life through the lens of mythology.

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NPR
Haves and Have Nots

Oct 18, 2013 - 00:00:00

Income inequality is at an all-time high between the haves and the have nots. But does the poverty gap have to be so wide, and can it potentially be eliminated altogether? In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas about inequality, and new ways we might achieve prosperity for all. Ernesto Sirolli recounts how well-intentioned aid programs can go awry; he says the first step to addressing poverty might be to “shut up and listen.” Author and politician Chrystia Freeland charts the rise of today’s billionaire plutocrats, and wonders what concentrated super-wealth means for the rest of us. Historian Niall Ferguson explains why, when it comes to amassing wealth, it’s been the West versus the rest for the past 500 years. Ghanaian economist George Ayittey says that when it comes to Africa, it’s up to a new generation to bring about accountability. Jacqueline Novogratz, CEO of Acumen Fund, discusses groundbreaking work that connects the poor to the global economy.

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NPR
Rebroadcast: Making Mistakes

Aug 23, 2013 - 00:00:00

We try so hard to be perfect, to never make mistakes and to avoid failure at all costs. But mistakes happen. And when they do, how do we deal with being wrong? In this episode, TED speakers look at those darker moments in our lives, and consider why sometimes we need to make mistakes and face them head on. Dr. Brian Goldman tells a profound story about the first big mistake he made in the ER, and questions medicine's culture of denial. Professor Brené Brown explains how important it is to confront shame. Also, jazz composer Stefon Harris argues that a lot of our actions are seen as mistakes only because we don't react to them appropriately. Plus, Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, tells the story of two unexpected collaborators, and how good disagreement is central to progress.

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NPR
To The Edge

Jul 26, 2013 - 00:00:00

Some people might only dream of adventure, but for others, there’s no other option but to explore the most extreme places on Earth. From the deepest caves to rough oceans, from the North Pole to dizzying heights on a high wire: what drives adventurers to constantly push to the brink of human endurance? In this hour, TED speakers share their experiences of going to the edge of our world. Arctic explorer Ben Saunders recounts his harrowing solo ski trek to the North Pole. Engineer and daredevil caver Bill Stone pushes the frontier to the remotest depths of the Earth. Roz Savage quit her high-powered job to become an ocean rower. High-wire artist Philippe Petit tells the amazing story of how he walked between the Twin Towers.

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NPR
Turning Points

Jun 28, 2013 - 00:00:00

Our lives are often defined by turning points. They can happen gradually or in an instant. But how do we reconcile the before and the after — our former selves with who we’ve become? In this hour, we hear from TED speakers who have been shaped by profound turning points in their lives. Surgeon and author Sherwin Nuland recalls how he broke free of a debilitating depression after undergoing electroshock therapy. Businessman Ric Elias had a front row seat on Flight 1549 that crash-landed in the Hudson River in 2009. He describes what went through his mind as the plane was going down. As a teenager, Maajid Nawaz was active in an extreme Islamist organization. But after spending five years in an Egyptian jail, he now devotes himself to promoting democracy in the face of extremism and xenophobia. Journalist Joshua Prager describes his life before and after a devastating bus accident that left him paralyzed on his left side. He probes questions of self-deception, identity, and whether the crash or his response to the crash has ultimately defined him.

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NPR
Framing the Story

Jun 7, 2013 - 00:00:00

Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. Stories affirm who we are, and allow us to experience the similarities between ourselves and others, real or imagined. Stories help us make meaning of our lives. In this hour, TED speakers talk with Guy Raz about the art of storytelling, and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world. Novelist Tracy Chevalier explains how she discovers a compelling story from inside a painting. Graphic designer Chip Kidd creates “visual haikus” — book covers that, in a single image, tell the story inside. Writer Chimamanda Adichie warns that if we hear only a single story about another person, we risk a critical misunderstanding. And filmmaker Andrew Stanton says good storytelling is starting at the end and working back to the beginning.

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NPR
Podcast Extra: Amanda Palmer on Crafting Her TED Talk

May 17, 2013 - 00:00:00

Musician Amanda Palmer told host Guy Raz it took months for her TED Talk to take shape. We couldn't fit this part of their conversation in the final cut of our new episode, "Giving It Away", so we've included it here. Plus, Amanda performs her "Ukulele Anthem" at TED. 

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THE JOE ROGAN EXPERIENCE
#606 - Randall Carlson

Feb 4, 2015 - 3:09:16

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